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So I changed my engine oil for the first time and put in exactly 5.5 qts. After several checks the oil level looks a little hight maybe 1/2 to 3/4 of a cm above the full mark(hole). I drive it for a few days. Let it sit in my level driveway for two hours and check it again tonight. its still hight. so i pull the plug on the oil pan and let some out. I'm guess i let out 1/2 qt before i got the oil level down to the full mark. I don't know forsure how much i let out because i was draining it into the pan from the oil change a few days back. Its now perfect. I crank the engine and let in run 30 seconds. Cut the engine off. Wait 30 seconds and check the level again, now its 1/2 qt low!

The dipstick has three holes...is 5.5 qts on the very top hole or the middle hole? is the best level the middle hole or the top hole?

When am I supposed to check the oil after its sits for 2 hours and lets all the engine drain into the pan? or after the engine has been off for a minute or so? Or some other time? When should the oil be right on the full mark?
 

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Ideally you should check it after it sits awhile (first thing in the morning, or after sitting say 20-30 minutes). This way, all the oil gets a chance to run back down into the oil pan for the most accurate check. All the times I've changed my oil (and filter) it's taken 5.5 quarts and the level has been almost perfect. I'd agree with you that maybe it reads a little high on the dipstick but not enough I'd want to drain any out. If you're a "little bit" high on the dipstick after adding 5.5 qts, I'd leave it. You're good.
 

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One thing to remember when you check your oil is that you need to be on a level surface. If you are on an inclined driveway or any other unlevel surface you will not get a true reading on the dipstick. :thumb:
 

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Is it true, if you have too much oil, that the main bearings can get messed up?

I can't see how.
 

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s2acadia said:
So I changed my engine oil for the first time and put in exactly 5.5 qts. After several checks the oil level looks a little hight maybe 1/2 to 3/4 of a cm above the full mark(hole). I drive it for a few days. Let it sit in my level driveway for two hours and check it again tonight. its still hight. so i pull the plug on the oil pan and let some out. I'm guess i let out 1/2 qt before i got the oil level down to the full mark. I don't know forsure how much i let out because i was draining it into the pan from the oil change a few days back. Its now perfect. I crank the engine and let in run 30 seconds. Cut the engine off. Wait 30 seconds and check the level again, now its 1/2 qt low!

The dipstick has three holes...is 5.5 qts on the very top hole or the middle hole? is the best level the middle hole or the top hole?

When am I supposed to check the oil after its sits for 2 hours and lets all the engine drain into the pan? or after the engine has been off for a minute or so? Or some other time? When should the oil be right on the full mark?

I have a question ...... do you pull out the dipstick, wipe the oil off, re-insert the stick, and then check the oil level? Or do you just check the level after the vehicle has been sitting for a while? Oil has a tendency to 'creep' up the dipstick if the vehicle has been sitting for a while. This may explain the 'high' oil level when the correct amount was put in. Just a thought.
 

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thetoys said:
Is it true, if you have too much oil, that the main bearings can get messed up?

I can't see how.
The only way that this would happen is if there were enough oil in the sump that it actually came into contact with the rotating crankshaft. This would cause the oil to 'froth' (get lots of tiny air bubbles in it). The 'froth' is not a very good lubricating liquid. The 'froth' can also cause the oil pump to lose its prime, meaning that oil is not circulated throughout the engine -- causing lots of internal damage.

On older engine designs that use push rods to engage the valves (versus our overhead cam design that doesn't use push rods), I've actually seen engines that would cease to run when they had too much oil. The 'froth' wouldn't have enough pressure to activate the lifters that pushed on the rods to open the valves. After the engine ran 10 to 15 seconds, it slowed to the point that it wouldn't run.
 

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xseler said:
thetoys said:
Is it true, if you have too much oil, that the main bearings can get messed up?

I can't see how.
The only way that this would happen is if there were enough oil in the sump that it actually came into contact with the rotating crankshaft. This would cause the oil to 'froth' (get lots of tiny air bubbles in it). The 'froth' is not a very good lubricating liquid. The 'froth' can also cause the oil pump to lose its prime, meaning that oil is not circulated throughout the engine -- causing lots of internal damage.

On older engine designs that use push rods to engage the valves (versus our overhead cam design that doesn't use push rods), I've actually seen engines that would cease to run when they had too much oil. The 'froth' wouldn't have enough pressure to activate the lifters that pushed on the rods to open the valves. After the engine ran 10 to 15 seconds, it slowed to the point that it wouldn't run.
There are also other issues, even with overhead cam engines. Recently I had a dealer (of another brand of cars) overfill the engine by more than two quarts. Before I was a mile away, the car was belching a significant cloud of blue smoke. What was happening was that the crank whipped it into a froth that worked its way up against the bottom of the pistons, was sucked past the rings into the combustion chamber and was burning there. Really made me feel great about what it did for my then, six month old, German V8.
 
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