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What grade gas do you put in the Acadia?

  • Premium - 90 or 91

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  • Super - 93

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Discussion Starter #1
My dealer probably fille dup with 89. Car wasn;t as responsive as I liked. 250 miles later I was on empty.

Filled up with 93 octane.

I definately find a difference in responsiveness of the engine.

Am I crazy?
 

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Actually, most cars today are designed to run on 87 octane. Putting 93 in it will not do anything for performance. It's not cleaner (as some ads may say) it actually burns slower than 87. The only time you need more octane is if your experiencing detonation (sparkknock) from maybe pulling a trailer or something. But for the most part I really think your throwing money down the drain or gas tank in this case.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
rs8018 said:
Actually, most cars today are designed to run on 87 octane. Putting 93 in it will not do anything for performance. It's not cleaner (as some ads may say) it actually burns slower than 87. The only time you need more octane is if your experiencing detonation (sparkknock) from maybe pulling a trailer or something. But for the most part I really think your throwing money down the drain or gas tank in this case.
Where did you get that info from?
 

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rs8018 said:
Actually, most cars today are designed to run on 87 octane. Putting 93 in it will not do anything for performance. It's not cleaner (as some ads may say) it actually burns slower than 87. The only time you need more octane is if your experiencing detonation (sparkknock) from maybe pulling a trailer or something. But for the most part I really think your throwing money down the drain or gas tank in this case.
I agree. I always go with the recommended octane rating for a car.

Happens to be 87 for the Acadia (unless you're towing, then use 89 if needed)

Newer cars are tuned to a specific octane rating and any more ain't gunna get you anything more....
 

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Pelle31 said:
isn't regular actually 87?
Labels for gasoline vary from state to state. Seems to me like higher elevations use higher octanes. For example, in Oklahoma, regular is generally 87, but in Denver Colorado, most gas stations had 89 as regular. It's just a theory, but I'm guessing the thinner air in high elevations needs a slightly higher octane fuel to manage the same knock-fighting power.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
OK. So you are saying I am crazy?!?!

lol

Well, for the 15 cent difference times the 20 gallons per fill up I will put in 93 octane. I don't drink coffee so that will be the 3.00 I woul dhave spent on a Starbucks Mocha Frappa Crappa Cino Soy Foam Latte Grande.

I have spent 3.00 on worse.
 

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87 simply beacause thats what recommended, and i m not planning to tow and more importantly 15cents times 20 gallons times roughly 45 fillups a year times 3 year (if the 20cents difference remains the same) is a lot if money, almost as much as what you would pay for oil changes every quarter in 3 years. 8)
 

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The dealer filled it with 87 octane when I picked it up (I know, because he took me with him and I watched).

I just had to fill it last night for the first time myself, and I put 89 octane in it (out of habit). I have yet to notice any change in how it drives or in the fuel economy.
 

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Its a gimmick anyways, all these different grade gases are stored in the same tank at the pump. You are getting 87 no matter what you choose. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #14
coopermine said:
Its a gimmick anyways, all these different grade gases are stored in the same tank at the pump. You are getting 87 no matter what you choose. :p
I always think that as well.
 

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Well, I don't fill up an Acadia yet, but unless it is too different than the last few cars, I will be putting in Plus (89) -- which should be a choice other than regular above.

Joe- I don't think you are crazy, but I think that you should have gone from 87 to 93 a little slower. (i would bet unless 87 is unavailable where you are, they did not fill up with anything higher). We will probably immediately go 89, but the Acadia will be going in the shop before I go putting in 91 (or 93, which is rare here).

On our 04 Grand Cherokee V8, and on my 96 Mustang V6, both get Plus-89. If we use regular-87, then the sparkknock will be there under heavy acceleration in the V8, and under regular acceleration for both on 85+ days. The Jeep has the same acceleration and power it seems with both grades of gas, the difference only being the sparkknock. The Mustang is more sluggish on warmer days unless it has 89.

The problem being is that even on the 96 Mustang, and especially on the 04 Jeep, the on-board systems start to learn the driving style and how the gas mixes, and by changing the octane around, it screws with performance. The Mustang seems to relearn fairly quickly after changing grades, but the Jeep takes a few hundred miles to relearn conditions (which is frustrating when taking it to mountains).

My 99 Explorer did run just fine on 87, as does my mother's 04 Envoy XL.
 

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Here's how I understand it...

On higher compression engines the manufacturers rec the higher octane fuel. The High Feature V6 in the Acadia is at 10.2 to 1. Pretty high number...This engine can run on 87 octane because it also has one of the most sophisticated engine control systems in the marketplace. This system control spark advance and other variables to keep the engine from detonating/knocking.

My guess is the use of a higher octane fuel will bring a little added performance and probably a little more in fuel economy. The engine can then advance the spark further and take advantage of the higher engergy available via the high octane fuel.

The higher octane fuels do have some added cleaning agents and conditioners in them compared to regular fuel so there is another benefit. You probably do not regain the added expense of high octane fuel returned to you in more mileage...but the combination of a slightly cleaner engine, slightly better performance and slightly better fuel economy might be worth it so some drivers.

...just my 2 cents worth...
 

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The higher octane fuels do have some added cleaning agents and conditioners in them compared to regular fuel so there is another benefit
From the EPA.........The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires that all octane grades of all brands of gasoline contain engine cleaning detergent additives to protect against the build-up of harmful levels of engine deposits during the expected life of your car.
 

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Sorry about that...I wasn't specific enough. All fuels do have cleaning agents and other additives to help the engines perform better. High octane fuels typically have additional cleaning agents above and beyond the lower octane fuels. Especially from the big brand names...BP, Shell, Mobil, etc.
 

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Here's some info from the Shell website on their Premium Fuel...

"Shell V-Power contains more than five times the amount of cleaning agents required by government standards."

"All Shell gasolines meet the TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline Standard. BMW, GM, Honda and Toyota have developed a TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline Standard that exceeds the EPA standards. TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline is a high-quality gasoline with enhanced cleaning power. It provides better protection against the build-up of carbon deposits on intake valves and fuel injectors, as compared to low- detergent gasolines. All Shell gasolines meet the coveted TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline Standard. There is a difference in the gasoline you choose."
 
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