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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think the Acadia / Traverse are great, but I'm holding off until GM can deliver better mileage. Otherwise, I think both are about perfect.

Has anyone heard any recent rumors about GM putting in the dual mode or BAS hybrid? Right now I get 19/26 on an 8 year old Honda Odyssey. I really can't justify spending $30k+ to get worse mileage than that. Rumor back in January was that GM's auto show reps were talking about a hybrid, but I've heard nothing since.
 

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Everything I have read says that the Acadia's design does not have the space for the hybrid option.
 

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Keep in mind you are moving up to a heavier and larger car with real sheet metal, not tin can thin metal and a heck of alot more features. Its a trade off. If you strictly want to stretch every drop of gas then maybe go for another smaller, less substantial vehicle. The Acadia has the best mileage of any vehicle in its class. Maybe you want another class?
 

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Keith - I agree with you about the Acadia being the best in it's class. But it's really hard to put it into a class as it sorta stands alone. It's large like the Yukon, Aspen and Expedition, but is not anywhere nearly as rugged for towing and hauling. It's a CUV with a light duty drive train like the Highlander, Pilot, and MDX, but is bigger. I hate to say it, but it is somewhat of a big minivan with doors.

To me, the bottom line for folks looking is this. Do not buy the Acadia if it does not specifically meet your needs unless you want to pay the extra to get the extra. And if you are worried about overall functionality, go buy a minivan. They really are still one of the best values out there.

For us, we got the Acadia mostly because of the comfort for road trips and the looks. It really exceeds our needs, and yes we are paying for more than we absolutely need, but I think we are getting the best comfort and functionality along with good looks for a very good value. If it was only about money and functionality, we would have bought a Toyota or Honda minivan. (yuck)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Keith said:
Keep in mind you are moving up to a heavier and larger car with real sheet metal, not tin can thin metal and a heck of alot more features. Its a trade off. If you strictly want to stretch every drop of gas then maybe go for another smaller, less substantial vehicle. The Acadia has the best mileage of any vehicle in its class. Maybe you want another class?
No - if I wanted another class of vehicle, I wouldn't be posting this question on the Acadia forum. ;) I want an Acadia class vehicle with decent mpg. Is that too much to ask?

Yes, the Acadia has "best in class mpg" - I'm not disputing that. But it boggles the mind that since 2000 (the year of my Odyssey), mpg in large vehicles has not improved one bit (the Hybrid Highlander, which I don't like, being an exception).

So my question remains...has anyone heard anymore rumor of a hybridized Lambda? I had heard rumor back in January, but nothing since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Snoguy said:
Maybe GM will put one of the new high mpg clean diesel engines in the Acadia, although I don't know if GM is moving very fast in the direction of clean diesels.
I've considered the clean diesels as a possible future option - but there is the problem of cost (about 15% higher price where I live) and availability (not at all stations). Plus, I'm a bit afraid my wife would somehow fill it with gas!
 

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I dont know where you get the idea that mpg has not improved in larger vehicles. The tahoe/yukon both get better gas mileage now than the previous generation tahoe/yukon. GM's trucks get better fuel mileage than any other brand and also better than they did 3 years ago in the previous platform. The acadia may not mileage as good as your Honda minivan but you have to remember this is a totally different class of vehicle. No hybrid Acadia's either. The Lambda platform does not have the room for the hybrid drivetrain.
 

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MtnBiker said:
Snoguy said:
Maybe GM will put one of the new high mpg clean diesel engines in the Acadia, although I don't know if GM is moving very fast in the direction of clean diesels.
I've considered the clean diesels as a possible future option - but there is the problem of cost (about 15% higher price where I live) and availability (not at all stations). Plus, I'm a bit afraid my wife would somehow fill it with gas!
I agree, but I'm hopeful that your concerns (except maybe the wife) might be rectified over the next several years. I'm in the wait and see mode right now.

To answer my own question about GM:

QUOTE:
General Motors is expecting their new Duramax 4500 diesel V-8 to be a popular option in their trucks after its 2009 introduction. The engines will be built at GM's Tonawanda, New York engine plant and the company is preparing to build 400 engines a day. That works out to about 94,000 engines a year. The new engine will be launching in the Hummer H2 and then get added to other full-size trucks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
dfrank78 said:
I dont know where you get the idea that mpg has not improved in larger vehicles. The tahoe/yukon both get better gas mileage now than the previous generation tahoe/yukon. GM's trucks get better fuel mileage than any other brand and also better than they did 3 years ago in the previous platform. The acadia may not mileage as good as your Honda minivan but you have to remember this is a totally different class of vehicle. No hybrid Acadia's either. The Lambda platform does not have the room for the hybrid drivetrain.
Well - the cross-over segment didn't exist in 2000. So by large vehicle, I am comparing the biggest people haulers out there - minivans. They have not improved in mpg since 2000. But it is true that in SUVs, mpg may have improved a bit, though it was awfully poor to begin with in most cases. So just as in 2000, there are still no 7-8 passenger people haulers that do better than about 17/24, other than the Highlander hybrid.

I also heard rumor that the dual mode hybrid would not fit the Acadia, but am not positive this is accurate. Regardless, GMs BAS hybrid should work on pretty much any GM vehicle from what I understand. Another option would be a introducing cylinder deactivation. Or, as Toyota is apparently planning to do with the Highlander, introduce a 2.7L 4 cylinder. Or Ford, which is apparently planning to introduce turbo-charged models more widely. At least GM is doing the right things with the 6 speed auto and direct injection.
 

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I think a CVT would have gotten better mileage then the 6-Speed. Cylinder De-activation would have been nice. No reason she couldnt drop to 4 on highways
 

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A smaller motor definantly would not work in the Acadia, the current motor is almost too small. As far as the cylinder deactivation goes unless GM squeezes a V8 under the hood. I think that with the 6 speed tranny a V8 would make better mileage than the v6 due to the better torque and power of the bigger engine and then the cylinder deactivation would be feasible.
 

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I read in Popular Mechanics that there may be a diesel available in 2010. Having owned a few diesels I think this would be a perfect fit for the Acadia. Torque is great for towing and >30 mpg highway would mitigate the higher cost of fuel.
 

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Diesel would be great but you have to consider the cost of diesel fuel versus gas. While towing my 6000 pound camper to Garner State Park last month my 5.3 liter Silverado made 10 mpg. The other people I travel with all drive Ford F-250's that are diesel and get around 15 to 17 while towing similar campers of around the same weight. Guess what? Although I got less MPG I spent less money because GAS is quite a bit cheaper than gas. Considering that I would think that the gain in fuel mileage would not be worth the added cost of a diesel motor, around 6 thousand for GM's current diesel plus the more expensive cost of diesel fuel. Unless GM makes a diesel capable of 50 plus MPG like Mercedes/Volkswagen, then it definantly isnt worth the cost.
 

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First off, diesels perform better than gas because of the torque and they run cooler. Second, diesel prices are an anomaly now and should get more in line with gas prices as before. In Europe more than 60% of vehicles sold there are diesel. Now that they run cleaner, quieter and perform as well as gas in acceleration they should be part of an overall energy policy.
As far as the initial extra cost it is usually recovered at resale. Usually someone shopping for a truck to use for towing, diesel is the first choice. That goes for new and used. Also don't forget that people are paying premium for hybrids and waiting long times for delivery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
dfrank78 said:
A smaller motor definantly would not work in the Acadia, the current motor is almost too small. As far as the cylinder deactivation goes unless GM squeezes a V8 under the hood. I think that with the 6 speed tranny a V8 would make better mileage than the v6 due to the better torque and power of the bigger engine and then the cylinder deactivation would be feasible.
I'm not so sure a smaller engine wouldn't be OK in an Acadia - unless you are towing. 0-60 is listed as 7.8 seconds by Motor Trend and when I test drove one I thought it felt plenty powerful. A Honda Pilot has a 0-60 of 9.7, a Mazda CX9 is 8.5 and a Highlander 7.8. I've owned an RX-7, Camaro, & Toyota Supra all with slower 0-60 times.

I think we've grown accustomed to ever faster vehicles at the expense of fuel economy. With gas at 4 bucks a gallon, I'll be a lot of people would be happy with a smaller engine, better gas mileage, and a bit slower 0-60.

Just my 2 cents...
 

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Well, although I tend in agree in general, any "utility vehicle" needs to be able to carry a load, tow a load, or at least perform well-enough to keep a majority of drivers happy. If you were to read some really old posts on this forum from a bunch of the "old guys" (a.k.a. those who were contributing to this forum in late 2006 thru early 2007), you'd find that lots of folks really like some power - even at the expense of 1-2 mpg.

It's a highly subjective preference. For me, I'll be moving from my old dog S-10 Blazer with all of 125 hp to a new Acadia with 288 hp - and all of that with no real change in mpg compared w/ what I've been driving for 21+ yrs. So my vote is: give me the ponies because I could always drive an economy car if mpg were the compelling factor.

My 2-cents...

Smooth <><[/color]
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Smooth said:
....It's a highly subjective preference...
I agree. But I'm arguing they offer both an "economy engine" and the standard engine. That way the customer can choose.

According to the link below, Ford is planning to offer a 2.5-liter turbocharged direct injection straight four with 260 hp and 300 lb ft of torque, that would get around 28 highway mpg, in their F-150. I'd buy an Acadia today if GM offered an engine like this.


http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/ford-f-150-to-get-turbo-4/

Edit:

Apparently GM offers an Ecotec 2.0L I-4 VVT DI Turbo with 260 horsepower on their HHR. Could this work on the Acadia?
 

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marc said:
First off, diesels perform better than gas because of the torque and they run cooler. Second, diesel prices are an anomaly now and should get more in line with gas prices as before. In Europe more than 60% of vehicles sold there are diesel. Now that they run cleaner, quieter and perform as well as gas in acceleration they should be part of an overall energy policy.
As far as the initial extra cost it is usually recovered at resale. Usually someone shopping for a truck to use for towing, diesel is the first choice. That goes for new and used. Also don't forget that people are paying premium for hybrids and waiting long times for delivery.
Some additional thoughts in support of diesels:
Coal can be made into cheap diesel fuel, and the US has enough coal in the ground to power all diesel motor vehicles(assuming everyone operated a diesel) for the next 50 years! There aren’t enough coal conversion plants right now, but more I'm sure will be built.

Americans love fads and hybrids are now the fad. :banghead: Hybrids also allow the "greenies" to show off their hybrids. This is in spite of the fact that hybrids are not cost efficient when you consider the premium one has to pay to purchase one. Please note I have nothing against greenies except on the issue of hybrids.

Additionally, there’s no way to recycle hybrid nickel metal hydride batteries, they are way too toxic to even be dumped into landfills. (Greenies please take note) Instead, they must be stored somewhere, which leaves some very important questions unanswered::help:
1-Where will all the spent hybrid car batteries be stored where they can’t poison the environment?
2-Who will pay for their continued storage?
3-Why aren’t the car companies saying anything about this issue? (They want to sell high profit hybrids and they really don't care about the environment)
4-How many owners of hybrid cars will balk at the huge expense of battery replacement and keep on driving them on gas power alone, which will wind up using more gasoline than their non-hybrid counterparts such as diesels?

I'll get off my soapbox now.:rant:

Dave
 

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Some additional thoughts in support of diesels:
Coal can be made into cheap diesel fuel, and the US has enough coal in the ground to power all diesel motor vehicles(assuming everyone operated a diesel) for the next 50 years! There aren’t enough coal conversion plants right now, but more I'm sure will be built.

Americans love fads and hybrids are now the fad. :banghead: Hybrids also allow the "greenies" to show off their hybrids. This is in spite of the fact that hybrids are not cost efficient when you consider the premium one has to pay to purchase one. Please note I have nothing against greenies except on the issue of hybrids.

Additionally, there’s no way to recycle hybrid nickel metal hydride batteries, they are way too toxic to even be dumped into landfills. (Greenies please take note) Instead, they must be stored somewhere, which leaves some very important questions unanswered::help:
1-Where will all the spent hybrid car batteries be stored where they can’t poison the environment?
2-Who will pay for their continued storage?
3-Why aren’t the car companies saying anything about this issue? (They want to sell high profit hybrids and they really don't care about the environment)
4-How many owners of hybrid cars will balk at the huge expense of battery replacement and keep on driving them on gas power alone, which will wind up using more gasoline than their non-hybrid counterparts such as diesels?

I'll get off my soapbox now.:rant:

Dave
[/quote]


While we're at it I understand these batteries need replacement after about 100k miles. A well maintained diesel can easily go in excess of 200k.
 
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