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I just drove my 2012 SLT1 AWD to Yosemite during a major winter storm. As a Californian I have very limited experience in winter driving but before the trip I did one thing right: I prepared a pair of contractor leather gloves just in case - later it proved very useful when I installed the snow chain.
We were entering the park from Oakhurst, as we saw snow piles on the road, CHP was already enforcing chain requirement. At that point the road was OK so the officer just made sure my car is AWD and didn't ask me to put on chains - he wanted me to carry one though but I told him it would available in my destination (Tenaya Lodge) so he let me pass.
The next morning the entire car was completely covered by snow and I purchased snow chain from the hotel gift shop. This forum suggested SCC Super Z6 but the store only carried QV747 - they look pretty similar so I bought it (My tire size 225/60r19). Installation in the heavy snow took a while since the rubber adjusters was really tight and my wife wasn't able to hook all 6 adjusters until I stepped in. It worked great from the sound and look of them - I was worried about the suspension struts too close to the tire and I even could hear rumbling sounds but later inspection didn't see any damage so I assumed it was alright.
I drove it happily for hours and had some fun in Wawona, I kept the car around 20 mph but was comfortably sped to 25 mph. right before entering the Wawona tunnel an incident happened: in a straight road at around 25 mph, my car suddenly lost traction and skid to the right, I responded correctly by not pressing brake and steering to the left, over-correction happened and the car skid to the left - so I steered to right immediately, however the car still lost control and spun about 180 degree until it gently hit a snow pile and eventually stopped - both car and passengers are fine but it was scary. I was lucky there were no other car around and the car hit the snow pile on the hill side not on the cliff side.

A few lessons learned:
1. Always over-prepare than under-prepare in snow condition. snow chain, waterproof safety gloves and shovel/brush.
2. Carefully select snow chains - Acadia's tire clearance is really low.
3. When putting on snow chain, if the rubber adjuster is too tight, try rotate the tire a few cycles it will auto-adjust and made it easier.
4. When uninstalling the snow chain, turn the wheel to the side so you can see behind the tire to unhook the chain (otherwise you won't see where the hook is and hard to find it). Not sure what to do if you had it on rear tires though - any suggestions?
5. Do not drive over 20 mph - no matter how confident your car makes you feel.

In general I am happy with this GMC Acadia 2012 AWD's performance in snow, it gave me confidence despite the incident. Next time I would probably install chains on all 4 tires not just the front ones.
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Wheel Car Tire Land vehicle Vehicle
Snow Automotive tire Slope Freezing Motor vehicle
 

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Good recommendations bu5 one I would like to add.

If you have little to no snow experience take the vehicle to an open parking lot and slide the car around. Slam the brakes on. This will let you know what the stability control will do and the anti lock brakes. While they can help you still need to know how the car reacts.

Also on many of the new cars the chain choice is limited and in some cases there may not be a model that could work Due to clearances. You got lucky they had a set that worked. Best to have a know set that works before you go or you may end up with a Ticket Or damaged vehicle.
 

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I just drove my 2012 SLT1 AWD to Yosemite during a major winter storm. As a Californian I have very limited experience in winter driving but before the trip I did one thing right: I prepared a pair of contractor leather gloves just in case - later it proved very useful when I installed the snow chain.
We were entering the park from Oakhurst, as we saw snow piles on the road, CHP was already enforcing chain requirement. At that point the road was OK so the officer just made sure my car is AWD and didn't ask me to put on chains - he wanted me to carry one though but I told him it would available in my destination (Tenaya Lodge) so he let me pass.
The next morning the entire car was completely covered by snow and I purchased snow chain from the hotel gift shop. This forum suggested SCC Super Z6 but the store only carried QV747 - they look pretty similar so I bought it (My tire size 225/60r19). Installation in the heavy snow took a while since the rubber adjusters was really tight and my wife wasn't able to hook all 6 adjusters until I stepped in. It worked great from the sound and look of them - I was worried about the suspension struts too close to the tire and I even could hear rumbling sounds but later inspection didn't see any damage so I assumed it was alright.
I drove it happily for hours and had some fun in Wawona, I kept the car around 20 mph but was comfortably sped to 25 mph. right before entering the Wawona tunnel an incident happened: in a straight road at around 25 mph, my car suddenly lost traction and skid to the right, I responded correctly by not pressing brake and steering to the left, over-correction happened and the car skid to the left - so I steered to right immediately, however the car still lost control and spun about 180 degree until it gently hit a snow pile and eventually stopped - both car and passengers are fine but it was scary. I was lucky there were no other car around and the car hit the snow pile on the hill side not on the cliff side.

A few lessons learned:
1. Always over-prepare than under-prepare in snow condition. snow chain, waterproof safety gloves and shovel/brush.
2. Carefully select snow chains - Acadia's tire clearance is really low.
3. When putting on snow chain, if the rubber adjuster is too tight, try rotate the tire a few cycles it will auto-adjust and made it easier.
4. When uninstalling the snow chain, turn the wheel to the side so you can see behind the tire to unhook the chain (otherwise you won't see where the hook is and hard to find it). Not sure what to do if you had it on rear tires though - any suggestions?
5. Do not drive over 20 mph - no matter how confident your car makes you feel.

In general I am happy with this GMC Acadia 2012 AWD's performance in snow, it gave me confidence despite the incident. Next time I would probably install chains on all 4 tires not just the front ones.
View attachment 11771 View attachment 11772 View attachment 11773

You did well.
Good advice especially for this time of year and season !
Driving through snowy mountainous areas can certainly be an adventure as you discovered. It does keep a driver on his or her toes.
We still live in the cold weather snow belt, but I always try and anticipate the weather if possible and avoid having to go anywhere let alone drive a long distance to or from an are where more than a few inches of snow may fall.

Back in the years when I down hill skied, we did venture out to Jackson Hole a few times in December and it was a delight. Fortunately, we only encountered a few 5 or 6 inch snow falls over a 5 day period. All the light fluffy stuff which was great for skiing.
 
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