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Has anyone replaced there transmission fluid with redline or royal purple, any feedback?
 

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Rat407 said:
I haven't changed ours yet but it is still new. I will change it out with AMSOIL ATF at 15k, no sense waisting good new fluid to soon, with the price of gas I need to save my pennies. :)

I have not heard much about Royal Purple ATF or Redline. You just need to make sure that they meet Dexron VI specification.
I believe the factory fill DEXRON-VI ATF is already synthetic. It seems like a bit of an overkill to change it at 15K.
I know Mobil 1 makes a DEXRON-VI Synthetic ATF.

GM Introduces New Automatic Transmission Fluid For 2006 Cars and Trucks

* New factory-fill fluid standard in all 2006 MY Hydra-Matic transmissions
* Significantly improved viscosity, shift performance and fluid durability
* Available through GM Vehicle Care products as DEXRON®-VI
* Approved for service application on all prior model year Hydra-Matic automatic transmissions

Pontiac, Mich. - GM, in conjunction with Petro-Canada and Afton Chemical Corporation, have developed a new, improved automatic transmission fluid for all 2006 model year Hydra-Matic automatic transmissions. Developed for factory-fill as RDL-3434 and registered for service fill as DEXRON®-VI, the new fluid represents a significant improvement in automatic transmission fluids and is the direct result of GM's industry leadership in the development and production of automatic transmissions.

"For 65 years, GM has led in the design, development and production of automatic transmissions," says Tom Stephens, group vice president for GM Powertrain. "This knowledge and experience has helped us work directly with the petroleum industry to develop a new fluid that will further accentuate the performance and reliability of GM's Hydra-Matic transmissions."

Automatic transmission fluid (ATF) is considered the life-blood of the automatic transmission. It is used to transfer power in the torque converter and provide the pressure to apply the transmission's various clutches and bands. It also is used to clean, lubricate and cool the components of the transmission. GM's new transmission fluid, DEXRON®-VI, was developed to have a more consistent viscosity profile; a more consistent shift performance in extreme conditions; and less degradation over time.

Beginning with the design and development of GM's new Hydra-Matic 6-speed rear-wheel-drive transmissions, GM Powertrain engineers determined the need for a new transmission fluid to withstand the complexity of the clutch-to-clutch transmission operation. Additionally, GM engineers identified opportunities to improve viscosity, durability, and impact on fuel economy with a new fluid.

"The development of DEXRON®-VI is the first time an automotive company has worked so closely with petroleum and additive companies to develop a new fluid," says Roy Fewkes, driveline fluids group leader, GM Powertrain. "The result is a new fluid that significantly outperforms existing fluids in every aspect. In fact, we have had to significantly extend the length of our durability tests to fully test the fluid's capability."

Internal GM tests have demonstrated DEXRON®-VI to deliver more than twice the durability and stability in friction tests compared to existing fluids. It also has demonstrated superior performance in pitting, foaming, oxidation and shear stability tests.

GM will begin factory-fill of the new transmission fluid on April 4, starting with the new Hydra-Matic 6L80, produced at the Willow Run transmission facility in Ypsilanti, Mich.

DEXRON®-VI will be available through genuine GM Vehicle Care products at GM authorized dealerships and service centers in Summer 2005.
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Yes the new GM Dexron VI is synthetic, but not all synthetics are created equal. It is just my standard practice to change out at 15k, from my experience the magnet in the pan has been packed with metal at that point and I like to clean it out from all that break-in material and go from there. It is just me, my way of getting that warm fuzzy feeling. Call me crazy. :blob: Plus my past experience with AMSOIL has been really good and I like it's track record. We keep our vehicles longer than most and they live a hard life. So from the fluid analysis's I have run on the engine oil and the ATF fluid all has looked great. So why not continue that trend. I'm not saying it is the way to go, it is just works for me. :thumb:
 

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Rat407 said:
Yes the new GM Dexron VI is synthetic, but not all synthetics are created equal. It is just my standard practice to change out at 15k, from my experience the magnet in the pan has been packed with metal at that point and I like to clean it out from all that break-in material and go from there. <snip> Call me crazy. :blob: Plus my past experience with AMSOIL has been really good and I like it's track record. We keep our vehicles longer than most and they live a hard life. So from the fluid analysis's I have run on the engine oil and the ATF fluid all has looked great. So why not continue that trend. I'm not saying it is the way to go, it is just works for me. :thumb:
I don't think your crazy Rat407, I do the same thing.
Changed oil every 3,000 miles till it turned 10,000 then put in synthetic.
 

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See that's funny, becuase everthing I have read is saying that the fluid is 100K long life fluid doesn't need to be changed. So OK at least they give you an interval for the tranny.

My question is what about the differential? Are you guys changing this at the 15-30K interval too?
 

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2ACADIA2 said:
See that's funny, becuase everthing I have read is saying that the fluid is 100K long life fluid doesn't need to be changed. So OK at least they give you an interval for the tranny.

My question is what about the differential? Are you guys changing this at the 15-30K interval too?
I will change the differential fluid the same time as the transmission fluid, around 20K use Royal Purple.
I read the owner's manual but do as I've always done. I don't use AC Delco filters, GM Optikleen Washer Solvent, use what has worked for me for years. To each their own :cheers:, use or do what's best for them :thumb:.
My last pickup a 95, had 350,000+ miles on it before it finally went to the scrap yard. It was a GM product, I changed the motor oil at 1500 miles then every 3000 miles, transmission fluid and differential fluids around 20K, lasted quite a long time.

Have a nice day ..........
 

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Went to check my trans fluid, and found the cap does not easily come off.
I don't want to force it and end up breaking something.
Anyone try to check the trans fluid yet?
 

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Copperhead13 said:
Went to check my trans fluid, and found the cap does not easily come off.
I don't want to force it and end up breaking something.
Anyone try to check the trans fluid yet?
My cap was easy to remove

When I bought my 07 there was no owner's manual; so the dealer gave me the manual from an 08. So I think how much difference can there be? WELL the 08 manual says it's not necessary to check the fluid level and if you want the level checked to take it to the dealership ??? That just seems weird to me

I received a PDF version of the 07 manual from Blue (BTW thanks a lot :thumb:) and here's what it says

Prepare the vehicle as follows:
1. Park the vehicle on a level place. Keep the
engine running.
2. With the parking brake applied, place the shift
lever in PARK (P).
3. With your foot on the brake pedal, move the
shift lever through each gear, pausing for
about three seconds in each one. Then,
position the shift lever in PARK (P).
4. Let the engine run at idle for three to
five minutes.
Then, without shutting off the engine, follow
these steps:
The transmission fluid
dipstick cap has this
symbol on it, and
is located near the
front of the engine
compartment.
See Engine Compartment Overview on page 396
for more information on location.
1. Remove the dipstick and wipe it with a clean
rag or paper towel.
2. Reinstall back in all the way, wait
three seconds and then pull it back out
again.
3. Check both sides of the dipstick, and read the
lower level. The fluid level must be in the
crosshatched area.
4. If the fluid level is in the acceptable range,
twist & lock dipstick cap in place.


So if I never received the 07 manual I may have just figured there wasn't a way to check the fluid level because the 08 manual says there's no reason to check it. Thanks again Blue ;D

Now that starts another question; why is there so much difference between the two manuals?
 

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jsimms said:
So if I never received the 07 manual I may have just figured there wasn't a way to check the fluid level because the 08 manual says there's no reason to check it. Thanks again Blue ;D

Now that starts another question; why is there so much difference between the two manuals?
That's pretty pathetic on GM's part. Apparently either GM thinks we are all complete idiots and can't figure out how to read a dipstick or they are just trying to push as much work into the dealer service departments as they can by making us think the dealer is the only one that can perform this task (kinda like changing light bulbs). ::)
 

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I thought that was the reason; trying to get people to go to the dealer for every little thing. I'm certainly no NASCAR mechanic, but I know the common stuff and I know how to check fluid levels. For me it's peace of mind to know that the fluid levels are good especially engine and trans.
 
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