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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When we originally purchased our Acadia, we had no need for the towing package b/c we had nothing to tow. However, shortly after, my father-in-law purchased a 24 ft. pontoon boat. We put an aftermarket hitch on our Acadia but are having problems with the light connections - the car didn't come equiped for these. I have 2 quesitons. 1) Does anyone know the "fix" for the missing connections in the fuse box for the lights? 2) Does anyone have any thoughts on the non-towing option Acadia being able to pull a 1950 lb boat + trailer?
 

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You should check out this thread http://www.acadiaforum.net/forum/index.php?topic=478.20 in regards to the wiring issue - print out and take to your service department and if they are any good they should be able to help you. In regards to being able to pull that weight, I do not think that this would be a problem for the Acadia - as long as you have the correct class hitch. I would recommend getting a transmission cooler installed, if you tow on any hills or for a long period of time this would protect your transmission from damage, if you are only going short distances (30 mile or so) then you might not need this.
 

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Supposedly, the limit without the tow package is 2000 pounds. For short distances it probably isn't a problem technically but legally if you ever got in a wreck someone could claim that you were overloaded and unsafe based on the manufacturer's limits.

With that said, I used to pull my 3700 pound boat & trailer a mile or two with my windstar a couple times a year. I wouldn't want to do it any further than that. The hitch was rated for 5000 pounds with a 500 pound tongue weight, so that wasn't an issue. The only difference in Ford's tow package for that vehicle (3500 pounds max) was that it came with a full size spare and transmission cooler. For the couple miles I did it, I wasn't too worried but again liability could be a big issue if there was ever an accident.
 

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I believe the 2000 LB limited capacity is due more to the lack of the towing package extras (oil and tranny cooler and the special gearing in tow/haul mode). If you have a certified Class III hitch bolted to the same frame as the GM hitch I do not see any issue with the weight that might cause an accident - there is nothing special about GM's Class III hitch as compared to another certified brand, the only difference is in the add ons I mentioned - the issue is what might happen to the warranty for engine/drivetrain parts if you do not have the tranny cooler and oil coolers installed - that is why I recommend the tranny cooler at a minimum as an option.
 

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Agreed that technically the only issue is potential damage to your own vehicle (most likely overheated transmission); however, we live in a very litigious society- if there ever was an accident I can imagine the opposing side jumping all over the fact that according to the manufacturer (who should know best) the vehicle is only designed to tow 2000 pounds. Any thing over that and you won't have much of a defense and will likely be found liable/negligent/wrong. (I work with a guy who used to do exactly this sort of lawyering- listening to police scanners, following wreckers and buying vehicles to support personal injury and product liability cases, etc. Don't underestimate just how low some guys will stoop to win a case! (No offense to the "decent" attorneys out there))
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you to everyone who has responded. This has been extremely helpful. Now I'm in the process of trying to get my fuse block replaced so I can get my lights to work. ???
 

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jseck2 said:
Agreed that technically the only issue is potential damage to your own vehicle (most likely overheated transmission); however, we live in a very litigious society- if there ever was an accident I can imagine the opposing side jumping all over the fact that according to the manufacturer (who should know best) the vehicle is only designed to tow 2000 pounds. Any thing over that and you won't have much of a defense and will likely be found liable/negligent/wrong. (I work with a guy who used to do exactly this sort of lawyering- listening to police scanners, following wreckers and buying vehicles to support personal injury and product liability cases, etc. Don't underestimate just how low some guys will stoop to win a case! (No offense to the "decent" attorneys out there))
What do you call a lawyer who doesn't chase ambulances?
-- Retired.

;D

All in fun, I know that there are many respectable lawyers out there, but I do agree with jseck2, that a lawyer probably would be all over this and GM has to cover their arses by placing this verbage in manual. :cheers:
 

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johnway said:
jseck2 said:
Agreed that technically the only issue is potential damage to your own vehicle (most likely overheated transmission); however, we live in a very litigious society- if there ever was an accident I can imagine the opposing side jumping all over the fact that according to the manufacturer (who should know best) the vehicle is only designed to tow 2000 pounds. Any thing over that and you won't have much of a defense and will likely be found liable/negligent/wrong. (I work with a guy who used to do exactly this sort of lawyering- listening to police scanners, following wreckers and buying vehicles to support personal injury and product liability cases, etc. Don't underestimate just how low some guys will stoop to win a case! (No offense to the "decent" attorneys out there))
What do you call a lawyer who doesn't chase ambulances?
-- Retired.

;D

All in fun, I know that there are many respectable lawyers out there, but I do agree with jseck2, that a lawyer probably would be all over this and GM has to cover their arses by placing this verbage in manual. :cheers:
Thats why i hate having Lawyers as parents.
 

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I purchased the Acadia without the tow package and added an auxilliary transmission cooler myself.
The whole front of the vehicle has to be removed in order to install the cooler in front of the A/C condenser.

The basic vehicle however already comes equipped with an engine oil cooler which is mounted at the bottom of the A/C condenser.

I have been told that adding the transmission cooler will increase the towing capacity to 4500lbs.
The only item missing is the tow/haul mode. I tow a 3000lb. boat with no problem. The engine temperature remains at normal while towing. The only issue I had to deal with was the trailer wiring harness which did not work.

There is a TSB issued in June where GM will replace the underhood electrical module for people that are using the vehicle to tow. This is done under warranty with no charge to the purchaser.
 

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I have been watching all this with interest. We also bought off the lot without the tow package, and now want to add one. I have to go in next week for an oil change. Do you have the TSB number so i can go ahead and get the wiring thing done at the same time?
 

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dinny said:
I have been watching all this with interest. We also bought off the lot without the tow package, and now want to add one. I have to go in next week for an oil change. Do you have the TSB number so i can go ahead and get the wiring thing done at the same time?
I think it is #07-00-89-021A, I copied the entire TSB from another thread for your review, you can print out and bring to the dealer. Let me know how it goes at the dealer as I want to do the same.

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Subject: Supplemental Information on Recreational Vehicle and Trailer Towing and Trailer Wiring Accommodation for Non-V92 Equipped Vehicles #07-00-89-021A - (06/27/2007)

Models: 2008 Buick Enclave

2007 GMC Acadia

2007 Saturn OUTLOOK

This bulletin is being revised to add models and revise dinghy towing procedures. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number 07-00-89-021 (Section 00 - General Information).

The purpose of this bulletin is to inform dealers of special procedures necessary when towing a trailer or when towing the vehicle behind a recreational vehicle.
Towing a Trailer

Trailer Weight Information
The following chart shows how much the trailer can weigh, based on the vehicle powertrain combination. Retailers should refer customers to the appropriate Owner Manual for important trailering tips, vehicle maintenance, and safety rules before towing a trailer.
Vehicle Maximum Trailer Weight
3.6L V6 (LY7) Engine with Front-Wheel Drive and 6-Speed Automatic Transaxle (MY9) with Trailer Provisions (V92) 4,500 lb. (2,041 kg)
3.6L V6 (LY7) Engine with Front-Wheel Drive and 6-Speed Automatic Transaxle (MY9), NO Trailer Provisions 2,000 lb. (907 kg)
3.6L V6 (LY7) Engine with All-Wheel Drive and 6-Speed Automatic Transaxle (MH6) with Trailer Provisions (V92) 4,500 lbs. (2,041 kg)
3.6L V6 (LY7) Engine with All-Wheel Drive and 6-Speed Automatic Transaxle (MH6), NO Trailer Provisions 2,000 lb. (907 kg)
Towing a Trailer with a Vehicle NOT Equipped with Trailer Provisions
2008 Buick Enclave, 2007 GMC Acadia and 2007 Saturn OUTLOOK vehicles that are not equipped with trailer provisions (RPO V92) must be modified with a new underhood bussed electrical center (UBEC) to provide full functionality for 4 circuits: ground, tail lamps, RH and LH stop/turn lamps. Refer to the Parts Information section in this bulletin for the correct part numbers. To find the original part number, remove the UBEC and look at the side of the UBEC.
This UBEC replacement should only be performed for customers who perform trailer towing. UBEC replacement for trailer towing is only covered under warranty for 2007 model year GMC Acadia and Saturn OUTLOOK vehicles, and 2008 Buick Enclave vehicles.
Towing a Trailer with a Vehicle with Trailer Provisions (RPO V92)
The following procedure may need to be performed to the backup lamp circuit. Perform this procedure only if the customer will be using the vehicle to tow.
1. Disconnect the X7 connector from the Body Control Module (BCM).
2. Remove the terminal for pin 3 from the BCM X7 connector. The wire to this terminal is dark blue and is the 38 circuit.
3. Re-connect the X7 connector to the BCM.
4. Cut the terminal off the end of this wire and strip the end of the wire.
5. Splice this wire into the 24 circuit wire that goes into BCM connector X6, pin 2. The 24 circuit is light green.
Recreational Vehicle Towing (Dinghy Towing)

Important: To avoid battery rundown while towing, remove the 50 amp BATT1 fuse in the UBEC. Refer to the dinghy towing procedure in this bulletin.
Recreational Vehicle Towing Information
Important: Vehicles with a 6-speed automatic transmission that are "dinghy towed" must be started at the beginning of each day and at each fuel stop for a minimum of five minutes.
Recreational vehicle towing means towing the vehicle behind another vehicle -- such as behind a motorhome. The two most common types of recreational vehicle towing are known as "dinghy towing" (towing the vehicle with all four wheels on the ground) and "dolly towing" (towing the vehicle with two wheels on the ground and two wheels up on a device known as a "dolly"). With the proper preparation and equipment, many vehicles can be towed in these ways. Refer to the appropriate model/model year Owner Manual for towing preparation guidelines and dolly and dinghy towing procedures. The Towing Chart below summarizes powertrain combination compatibility with dolly and dinghy towing methods.
2008 Buick Enclave, 2007 GMC Acadia, 2007 Saturn OUTLOOK Recreational Vehicle Towing Chart

Powertrain Combination and Towing Method Rear Wheels on a Tow Dolly Front Wheels on a Tow Dolly All Four Wheels on the Ground (Dinghy)
3.6L V6 (LY7) Engine with Front-Wheel Drive and 6T75 Six-Speed Automatic Transaxle (MY9) No Yes Yes*
3.6L V6 (LY7) Engine with All-Wheel Drive and 6T75 Six-Speed Automatic Transaxle (MH6) No No Yes*
*Notice: If the vehicle is equipped with a 6T75 six-speed automatic transmission, it can be dinghy towed from the front for unlimited miles at 65 mph (105 km/h). To avoid vehicle damage, never exceed 65 mph (105 km/h) while towing Buick Enclave, GMC Acadia and Saturn OUTLOOK vehicles. The repairs would not be covered by the warranty.
Dinghy Towing Procedure
Notice: If you tow your vehicle without performing each of the steps listed under "Dinghy Towing," you could damage the automatic transmission. Be sure to follow all steps of the dinghy towing procedure prior to and after towing your vehicle.
Notice: Don't tow a vehicle with the front drive wheels on the ground if one of the front tires is a compact spare tire. Towing with two different tire sizes on the front of the vehicle can cause severe damage to the transmission.
Important: Buick Enclave, GMC Acadia and Saturn OUTLOOK vehicles may only be dinghy towed from the front, with all four wheels on the ground.
1. Position the vehicle to tow and then secure it.
2. Shift transmission to PARK (P) and turn the ignition to OFF.
3. Set the parking brake.
4. Turn the ignition to ACCESSORY.
5. Shift your transmission to NEUTRAL (N).
6. To prevent your battery from draining while the vehicle is being towed, remove the 50 amp BATT1 fuse in the UBEC, and store in a safe location.
7. Release the parking brake.
Once you have reached your destination, do the following steps:
1. Set the parking brake.
2. Reinstall the BATT1 fuse.
3. Shift the transmission to PARK (P), turn the ignition key to OFF and remove the key from the ignition.
4. Release the parking brake.
Parts Information

Part Number Description
25784721 Underhood Bussed Electrical Center
(replaces 25784722)
25784723 Underhood Bussed Electrical Center
(replaces 25784726)
25784725 Underhood Bussed Electrical Center (replaces 25784724)
Warranty Information

For vehicles repaired under warranty, use:
Labor Operation Description Labor Time
N1730 Block Assembly, Wiring Harness Junction - Engine - Replace 0.3 hr

GM bulletins are intended for use by professional technicians, NOT a "do-it-yourselfer". They are written to inform these technicians of conditions that may occur on some vehicles, or to provide information that could assist in the proper service of a vehicle. Properly trained technicians have the equipment, tools, safety instructions, and know-how to do a job properly and safely. If a condition is described, DO NOT assume that the bulletin applies to your vehicle, or that your vehicle will have that condition. See your GM dealer for information on whether your vehicle may benefit from the information.

WE SUPPORT VOLUNTARY TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION

© Copyright General Motors Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
 
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