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Anyone running 18" snow tires? Taking delivery of our 2009 this week. Has 19s on it, and I'm a huge fan of snow tires (analogy: wear dress shoes to work, wear gym sneakers to the gym). I got a used set of 18" wheels and looking to mount snows on them.

1. anyone have a preference of snows? I found a Nokian Haka and a Hankook iPike that will fit. Anything else out there?
2. if I skip the TPMS sensors in the 2nd set of wheels, will the system beep at me (more importanly, my WIFE) all winter? Any way to bypass?

Thanks everyone!
Newbie Dave
 

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You might want to visit tiretrack.com for ratings of snow tires. I run blizzack's on my pony and have been most happy with them over the years. I think they are still rated second best. 18's on my wife's Acadia which are the original tires are rated as M/S and have more of a snow tread, have worked just fine in 10 inch plus snow to and from the bank every day during snow season.
 

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I was going to order the Nokian studded snows, but the tire shop said they had Hankooks in the correct size. I'm not familiar with the name, but at $800+ mounted & balanced, they should be good.

I too, bought a spare set of 18" factory rims, and elected to get a set of sensors from GM Parts Direct (the part numbers are in another post here). Besides the warning lights, I'm under the impression that Onstar will keep bugging you about the problem.
 

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I have a set of the Hankook I Pike waiting to get installed. They look a lot like the Nokian snow tire. I got them in the stock 255/65 18 size for $130 a piece.



I've never used Hankook snows before. We had our first snow this weekend and the stock Goodyears did well enough in the snow and slush but ice traction wasn't very good.
 

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Regarding the TPMS... the dealer might be able to disable the system for you for winter and then you can come back in spring to reapply the TPMS sensing adaption. I have done that with my German cars. And your system will detect something is missing once you remove you current wheels with the TPMS. How often it alerts you on the GMC's, I am not sure.
 

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I am in the middle of this same process and decision (to TPMS or not to TPMS...).

I am mounting my snow tires on a set of alloy take off rims, and would just as soon not spend the $200+ on a set of 4 sensors. I asked my service guy about this, and he said that the low pressure light on the dash would be on constantly and that the car would chime periodically to warn of low pressure. He figured that "it will drive you crazy".

The interesting second chapter of this is that he referred me over to Parts dept for a quote on the sensors. When I told the parts guy my tale of woe, he said "I think Service can disable that warning for you. Oops, I'm not supposed to tell you that."

As I did this by phone, I didn't call Service back to ask about this. I'm betting that they either can not or will not disable it for liability concerns.

Regarding snows, I had my heart set on Nokian Hakka SUV 5. I've now had 3 local dealers say they can't get them in the more common 265 60 18 size which should work on the Acadia. I see them on various websites, but apparently there are none to be had locally in Utah. I guess I don't want them badly enough to ship them here, then pay for mounting.

I can confirm what others are saying about the OE size (255 65 18). I have found the Hankook i-Pike, but no others. I've decided against these since they are not a true "studless" but a "studdable" tire. I don't want studs due mainly to road noise, and also because the studs seem to wear out or fall out faster than the tire itself. The tire comes either with or without studs, but the traction pattern and sipes don't look as effective to me as Nokians and others. I'll be interested in feedback after this winter from those who tried the i-Pike.

So, I'm now looking at other brands of studless snow tire in the 265 60 18 size. I know Blizzak DM-Z3 are highly rated. One dealer claimed that a Toyo Observer was just as good as Blizzaks, and his price on a Toyo set of four was over $100 less than Blizzaks. So, I'm leaning slightly toward the Toyos right now.

I need to decide quickly, or I'll dither myself out of all options, and be stuck with the Goodyear Forteras (32K miles) for a second winter. If this happens, I'll be hatin' life and kicking myself!
 

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Personally, I think the TPMS will be an albatross around our necks. Besides dealing with winter tires, there's the inevitable failure of the sensors internal battery. A friend of mine was quoted $200 to replace a single sensor.

I've already had sensors installed in the wife's winter tires, but I'm toying with putting the sensors I bought for my truck's winter tires into some kind of pressurized container (PVC)? My truck calls for 72 psi in the rear tires, which I think is too much for my empty bed. The decoy sensors under the seat would allow me to run whatever pressure I wanted.

On the subject of the Hankook I Pikes, I was looking at the set I bought and noted that there is a directional arrow on the sidewall. That kind of messes up the rotation pattern I'm accustomed to.
 

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Every studless snow tire I've owned previously or looked at has been directional. I think you might have to live with that. On prior vehicles, I've just done the front-to-rear rotation, and it seemed to work out. I know what you mean, though; I also felt funny at first not crossing them diagonally.

Regarding TPMS, I think we can thank our helpful Uncle Sam for this. I've been told that all cars sold in the US after some certain date (roughly corresponding to the 2009 model year) must have a TPMS system. This is a safety thing, much like the introduction of seat belts and airbags in years gone by.

Good to know that someone is watching out for our well-being!
 

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I've read that narrower winter tires are better, but from the Toyo description (see below), it appears wider is better. Now I', confused. Any idea what is truly the case? Does the benefit of wider tires peak at a certain measurement (such as 255 mm), and then degrade from there?



In short, the TOYO OBSERVE G-02 plus is designed to deliver a secure winter ride with added comfort in the worst of Canadian winter conditions.

TOYO has seriously improved traction through technology. New tread design, new tread compound and a wider footprint[/color] give the OBSERVE G-02 plus increased winter performance.

Serious Tread Compound
Lamella crystals help “vacuum” away moisture from under the tread allowing better direct contact between the tire and road surface.

Silica in the tread compound helps improve wet traction, allows the rubber to retain its softness in low temperature conditions and resists hardening with age. Improved Microbit Technology increases traction and braking on ice and compacted snow.

Serious Tread Design
Increased sipe density further improves water evacuation resulting in improved levels of ice traction. Larger wave sipes also increase lateral traction on ice and other slippery surfaces. Full depth tread design increases safety and traction throughout the life of the tire. Saw tooth tread block shapes result in an increased edge effect, giving improved braking and acceleration in snow. Contact area of OBSERVE G-02 plus is increased by 25% for better dry & wet handling, ice braking and tread life.

Serious Comfort
Optimization of the tread pattern arrangement in the OBSERVE G-02 plus by shifting tread blocks 1/2 pitch results in a reduction of pattern noise levels adding to driving comfort. The twin shoulder design has been developed to improve dry road stability at highway speeds.

MICROBIT TECHNOLOGY
It’s like driving with thousands of tiny steel spikes on your tire.

That’s because Toyo’s revolutionary Microbit technology actually has thousands of finely ground walnut shell particles embedded into the tire compound.

It’s the positive aspects of studded tires that inspired our Toyo Observe passenger tire series (G-02, Garit HT, G-03, X-10) and GP-4 light truck tire.

One of the world’s hardest substances, walnut shells actually dig into ice and snow like miniature steel spikes, providing exceptional gripping power and handling in treacherous winter driving conditions. All with minimal tire and road surface wear.

EXCEEDS TRANSPORT CANADA"S PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
The result is a standard of performance in severe winter conditions that’s certified by Transport Canada. Which means you’ll be in better control when the weather gets really nuts.

GET GROOVED ON ICE AND SNOW
In addition to our revolutionary Microbit technology, our Observe Series and GP-4 light truck tires have thousands of traction groves in the actual tread block.

These "traction sipes" act like tiny squeegees that wipe away the water film on the ice, giving you better contact and therefor more bite on ice and snow.

The tread blocks are ingeniously designed to allow smooth movement of snow and slush when you're rolling, while the wider trailing edge provides greater resistance for braking and steering.

Toyo's unique tread design incorporates thousands of sipes to maximize grip-generating "squeegee" effect as the rubber surface grabs the snow.

Our traction sipes are either waved or closed at each end to maintain multi-directional stability and strength, so you get superior traction and handling.
 
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