GMC Acadia Forum banner
21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
2017 Acadia SLT-1; AWD V6; Crimson Red Tintcoat; Towing Pkg; 102,700 miles (as of 11/29/2021)
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I don’t think they would be swapable. They might bolt on but how would you wire it? Right, there is no shifter starting with the 2020. The little pull buttons aren’t bad. I liked the shifter better though
yes, i thought the wiring might pose an issue.Thank you!
 

·
Registered
2017 Acadia SLT-1; AWD V6; Crimson Red Tintcoat; Towing Pkg; 102,700 miles (as of 11/29/2021)
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
Agreed. I thought the buttons were in an odd location
My wife just got a '22 Santa Fe, placement is great, easy access, great ergonomics.
I'll still keep my Acadia miles over her SF, but if I had a 20+ Acadia the shift button locations would irritate me. Between Acadia and Terrain loaners, drove 3-4 days with that odd placement. The Caddy CT4 was worse IMO however.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Motor702

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
Thank you all for the input...I have a lot of personal opinions on this as well...the primary rationale, for me I suppose, is that I'd like to have a bit of early warning with someone coming over into my lane...it's happened often enough that i'm basically alongside a vehicle when someone decides i'm expendable and begins coming onto the lane i'm in, one time to the point i went so far to the left when someone came from the right that my handlebar end ended up scraping against the concrete jersey barrier at the median...a blinking light would have most likely caught my attention via peripheral vision and worst case i'd either see something while scanning my mirrors or turning my head, checking surrounding traffic.

Beyond that, I feel i agree with most of the comments...perhaps aside form the question/comment that they're not critical to vehicle safety...to a great extent, they are not, because there are so many other safety features on vehicles these days that you can almost be deaf, dumb and blind...and aside form playing a mean pinball, you'll survive just about most accidents you might get into. I do think they play a role in increased visibility in traffic (i -perhaps poorly- liken this to the high-mount brake lights which strobe initially and then stay lit solid)...where that added, albeit slower strobe/blink of a turn signal may catch someone's attention depending upon where they are located in relation to the vehicle with the blinker on.

-i completely agree that with the way many folks drive, it does not matter if turn signals are installed on a vehicle at all...
-i also agree with the comment regarding driving defensively
-unfortunately, current automotive design doesn't necessarily seem to improve visibility around/looking out from inside the vehicle either and so all these devices have been added instead, making up for much of the lost visibility...i feel there is also a potential inherent laziness (perhaps that's not the right word here) borne out of the dependence on these devices...and we're, to some extent, blindly allowing technology to perform simple tasks that were once common knowledge to most drivers (turning your head to check prior to a lane change, ability to parallel park, ability to back up using mirrors, lowering mirrors to assist with backing up...along with side marker turn signals, this reminds me that saab had one of the better lighting systems when the vehicle was placed in reverse, with a light, lighting up the side along the body of the car, but located near where a side marker light would be, illuminating additional area while backing up)

it's just sad that folks are so disconnected from their driving that people practically do not need to mind many of the details while driving yet there are enough safety devices built in that help accommodate for that lack of driving...while it is nice that there is technology capable of doing all these great things, i believe many people simply let it do everything for them without any care or thought of also performing the manual version of those functions along with the vehicle's systems...this goes off tangent a bit, but lately it has been shocking for me to see how many people drive with no headlights or whatever minimal level auto-headlights function their vehicle provides, in the dark and in horrible weather conditions where it's further difficult to see other vehicles...sorry for the long pseudo-rant...i just see it so frequently, i'm surprised there aren't more accidents and it seems to be dramatically worse the past couple of years than i've ever noticed it before (perhaps it's just our area of the country...for what it's worth, we are in western Washington State, about 20 miles south/southeast of Seattle)
OK. Now I understand that you are a motorcycle driver. You are more exposed to not being seen by the other driver.

george
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,708 Posts
Do you think, that perhaps, if folks had taken a motorcycle instruction class prior to getting a basic driver's license, then they'd be more aware of motorcycles???
Interesting question, and to be honest, I never really thought about it.

I started riding in 1969. If it wasn't raining or snowing, I regularly commuted by bike. I loved riding and even dragged raced bikes in the 70's. Stopped riding about 10 years ago, watching for and expecting to be cut off just made riding too much like work.

I don't think having someone with no interest in riding, take a motorcycle instruction course, would make a lot of difference. Too many drivers just oblivious on to the world around them.
 

·
Registered
2017 Acadia SLT-1; AWD V6; Crimson Red Tintcoat; Towing Pkg; 102,700 miles (as of 11/29/2021)
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Interesting question, and to be honest, I never really thought about it.

I started riding in 1969. If it wasn't raining or snowing, I regularly commuted by bike. I loved riding and even dragged raced bikes in the 70's. Stopped riding about 10 years ago, watching for and expecting to be cut off just made riding too much like work.

I don't think having someone with no interest in riding, take a motorcycle instruction course, would make a lot of difference. Too many drivers just oblivious on to the world around them.
Thank you...I just always thought there'd be a heightened awareness...possibly similar to the - and i'm pretty sure there's a name for it - effect that once you buy a specific vehicle model, you suddenly see it on on the road everywhere...when perhaps it didn't seem as prevalent/ubiquitous previously...with you on the regular riding as well...the 1st year i owned my 1st motorcycle, i put over 15,000 miles on it...had well over 125K miles on it (the odometer stopped working somewhere north of 125K miles) when we parted...today's traffic -and all the distracting vehicular technology- definitely makes it more like work...i will also credit in part the lack of folks driving a stick to a further "disconnectedness" from the road and the overall driving experience
 

·
Registered
2017 Acadia SLT-1; AWD V6; Crimson Red Tintcoat; Towing Pkg; 102,700 miles (as of 11/29/2021)
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
OK. Now I understand that you are a motorcycle driver. You are more exposed to not being seen by the other driver.

george
oh, definitely...the general lack of being noticed/lack of awareness, simple lack of regard (i.e. "I'm bigger than you" mentality) or some of both...is everywhere...and the exposure is real...anyone riding is basically completely exposed and sitting over a motor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
oh, definitely...the general lack of being noticed/lack of awareness, simple lack of regard (i.e. "I'm bigger than you" mentality) or some of both...is everywhere...and the exposure is real...anyone riding is basically completely exposed and sitting over a motor
Then why do it?

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,622 Posts
Agree . Riding is something I would compare to downhill skiing. Both require skill and awareness. Awareness of both what you are doing and what others are doing around you and the conditions. Both provide an enjoyable independent experience. But watch out for others and what they are doing.
Loved my time trail bike riding when I was in the Air Force in Alaska as well as road rides on the Harley I owned later. Wish I could only could catch air like I once did on the little Hodaka 100 I had back when I myself weighed much less. LOL

Like driving a vehicle and signalling directions and intentions, not all do so. The results can be unnerving to say the least and catastrophic at worst.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top