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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
5W-30 vs. 10W-30
New motors are much tighter tolerances, smaller passages, etc. than in the days of yore.
FYI; I had an '04 Z06, it also called for 5W-30
Ya my 02 calls for the same



there would be one key turn/chance to get the truck running. :D
That is what prompted the change starting back in the 90,s
With the thicker oil in the crankcase when the Temps dropped the engine would turn over slower yet the fuel injection would still deliver the same amount of fuel and flood out the engine.
Bob Gutowski from the Warren training center told us that as well as using 10 weight oil as opposed to 5 weight in our climate. Their reasoning for a blanket coverage using the 5w30 was because they didn't know if the car was going to Alaska or the Mojave desert, made sense to me back then

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Boy does this sound familiar!



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Not the wrong oil
5w30 is for northern climates where the Temps fall below freezing and stay there. If I were to park my vehicles outside here in lower Michigan 5w30 would be in, that is straight from Detroit where I went for GM training towards my world class technician status.

Engine oil has always lubricated timing chains and kept the internal Temps in check.
The only oil squirter that I'm aware of is in my lawnmower, not sure where you got that idea!

With over 200,000 miles on it I'm not putting a thinner synthetic oil that gets changed every 6 weeks

That and the inside looks clean to me so I must be doing something right

P.S. word on the street is that these engines are junk, since mine seems to run pretty strong I'm still in the fence. Just that noise!!!


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From engine specs easily found online...
The V-6 VVT engine family was developed with pressure-actuated oil squirters in all applications. Three jet assemblies in the block hold a pair of oil-squirting nozzles that drench the underside of each piston and the surrounding cylinder wall with an extra layer of cooling, friction-reducing oil. The jets reduce piston temperature, which in turn allows the engine to produce more power without reducing long-term durability. The extra layer of oil on the cylinder walls and wristpin further dampens noise emanating from the pistons
 
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
From engine specs easily found online...
The V-6 VVT engine family was developed with pressure-actuated oil squirters in all applications. Three jet assemblies in the block hold a pair of oil-squirting nozzles that drench the underside of each piston and the surrounding cylinder wall with an extra layer of cooling, friction-reducing oil. The jets reduce piston temperature, which in turn allows the engine to produce more power without reducing long-term durability. The extra layer of oil on the cylinder walls and wristpin further dampens noise emanating from the pistons
I did not know that
Still doesn't explain my original issue!
I'll get the engine up to temp from a 20 mile trip
Change the oil, filter then run it for a couple of hundred miles then get back with the results

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Not the wrong oil
5w30 is for northern climates where the Temps fall below freezing and stay there. If I were to park my vehicles outside here in lower Michigan 5w30 would be in, that is straight from Detroit where I went for GM training towards my world class technician status.

Engine oil has always lubricated timing chains and kept the internal Temps in check.
The only oil squirter that I'm aware of is in my lawnmower, not sure where you got that idea!

With over 200,000 miles on it I'm not putting a thinner synthetic oil that gets changed every 6 weeks

That and the inside looks clean to me so I must be doing something right

P.S. word on the street is that these engines are junk, since mine seems to run pretty strong I'm still in the fence. Just that noise!!!


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they have oil squirters, so does the 2.4 engines and others
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...I'll get the engine up to temp from a 20 mile trip
Change the oil, filter then run it for a couple of hundred miles then get back with the results...
With 5W-30?
 

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Yes the Gen 1s did have a lot of timing chain problems but in my opinion using the full synthetic 5W30 prevented a lot of those issues. My 08 had over 212,000 before I sold it, never a timing chain issue.
 

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I did not know that
Still doesn't explain my original issue!
I'll get the engine up to temp from a 20 mile trip
Change the oil, filter then run it for a couple of hundred miles then get back with the results

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cornerman, did I state that you changed the timing chain?
 

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So where are we Cornerman/ Do you have Full Synthetic 5W30 fully up to the up upper hashmark? If so how is it starting?
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
So where are we Cornerman/ Do you have Full Synthetic 5W30 fully up to the up upper hashmark? If so how is it starting?
Yes, Just past the full hash mark
The original noise is still there, this is the wife's ride and she said that it did make the noise before winter set in. I only noticed it because I drive it in the winter months.

You know
The "chain dragging on the front cover noise" is still there BUT, it does not seem to run rough just after start up. 500 miles so far

The Chevrolet garage thinks that an actuator isn't parking correctly, same noise as last year. Not sure how oil could affect this but it is more than possible I suppose

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I think the Chevy garage is referring to the camshaft phasers. If I’m not mistaken the actuators are the electrical solenoids that are inserted into the front of the timing cover.

The actuators supply regulated oil to the camshaft phasers, which are bolted to the front of the camshafts. The amount of oil supplied to the phasers depends on the oil pressure that’s being produced by the oil pump. At higher RPMs the pump puts out more pressure compared to low pressure at idle. The actuators then regulate the pressure to the phasers based on engine load noted by the ECM. This in turn advances or retards the valve timing optimizing fuel economy, horse power and at the same time lowering emissions.

Once the engine is turned off, oil pressure goes to zero and the camshaft phasers should go to the park position. Each phaser has a small pin inside that engages into a slot at the end of the camshafts when the engine is off. The camshafts and phaser then function as a single unit for the next start up.

If the phasers don’t return to park, when the engine starts that phaser is just flopping around on the front of the camshaft until oil pressure builds up and the actuator starts supplying oil to it. This action is similar to doing a oil and filter change. Upon starting the engine it’s common to hear the lifters rattle until the new oil filter is filled and oil is supplied to the lifters.

I hope this wasn’t too length and makes sense. Please post your findings. Posting your findings will help the next person dealing with a similar problem and cause the forum to be more effective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Not to lengthy
My brother in law worked at Delphi making them (cam phasers) back when they were just being introduced to the automotive industry and he was not able to get my one for me to look at, every one was accounted for like it was gold.

New engines being influenced by China changed things, they are not small block chevys anymore
Thank God I got out of the business before all this came out

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I’ve had excellent success using aftermarket units. They run approximately $50.00 each. I’ve installed over 30 units and haven’t had a single one to fail starting as far back as 3 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I’ve had excellent success using aftermarket units. They run approximately $50.00 each. I’ve installed over 30 units and haven’t had a single one to fail starting as far back as 3 years.
What was your reason for changing them?

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Anytime I do a complete rebuild on one of these engines I always replace them. There’s a pretty simple way to do a preliminary check. Using a open end wrench on the hex fittings of the camshaft, hold the camshaft steady. Then using your free hand try and turn the cam phaser. The phaser should be in the park position (locked to the camshaft) due to no oil pressure. If the phaser can be twisted back and fourth it’s faulty.

Any time the chain jumps and causes a valve to piston collision it’s also a good idea to change them. In this situation, the phaser may return to the park position but may not respond to the ECM signal to advance or retard properly.

I kept a set from the last chain job I did. After ordering the bit to dissemble them, it looks like the major issue with these units is dirt or sludge build up from not changing the engine oil. I cleaned them up, used transmission fluid as a lubricant and reassembled them. I did record a video of the entire process. I intend to post the video depending on how well they work on the next chain job.
 

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Yes it can. If the phaser doesn’t return to the park position once the engine is turned off, it will make a rattling noise upon restarting. The noise will continue until oil pressure is supplied to that phaser via the actuator which would be a matter of seconds. Additionally, the noise will be more prevalent during cold starts. As mentioned in a previous answer, this noise is the result of the phaser moving freely on the end of the camshaft. Just like the first start of a engine after a oil and filter change, it’s not uncommon to hear the lifters rattle in the engine for a few seconds until oil pressure builds up. Although the lifter rattle is a different noise from the actuators, the principal is the same.
 
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