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Wasn't it that way in the previous (Lambda) design? :rolleyes:
Yes it is. I have a 2015 and AWD only.
Kind of. We have a 2010 Acadia. Our driveway is fairly steep and in the winter you can really tell what it's doing. The default mode is FWD, the traction control/stabilitrak system will kick in the AWD when needed, and does so very quickly, but I can feel the little slippage first (my wife can't). Essentially it's an automatic version of what it sounds like has been changed to manual on the newer ones. I was surprised to read this had changed and turns me off from a new Acadia when we'll be looking in a couple years.

This behavior can also seen when certain maintenance items come up. We recently had a rear wheel speed sensor go bad as well as the bearing surface that it reads off from. It was shutting down the traction control/stabilitrak/ABS, but also throwing up a message periodically saying it locked out the AWD system from engaging (not those exact words). This is all to say it's an electronic automatic system at least in the early years of AWD on the Acadias.
 

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I have a 2018 AWD and figure that I will treat it like my old trucks with Auto 4x4. I ran it in 2 wheel drive unless I was expecting a possibility of it needing more. Then I just put it in Auto for the day.
No big deal IMO and I prefer and like that it has the 2 wheel drive option. Has to be “a little” less where an tear on the drivetrain and saves “a little”gas. Why not really.
If you don’t want to play with it once and a while you can just leave it in AWD.


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i purchased my 2017 acadia in AWD because we live in a snow belt region, and this vehicle transports my wife and kids 99% of the time. We never take it out of AWD regardless of the weather season, and have never had any issues whatsoever (knock on wood). Also, the dealer does the service and they have always seen it come in the shop with AWD active and not once have they mentioned anything bad about it.

It is an all wheel drive vehicle, which can be FWD if needed - that is how i treat it.
 

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I just purchased my 2017 this summer, and wintry weather has settled in hear in Michigan.

My 4x has worked great in the times I've needed it, and it will stay in 4x when you set it there unlike tow or sport mode.

Are there pros and cons to leaving it like that for extended periods? Wondering about wear and tear, mileage, etc.

My 97x would just kick it in when needed, so new territory for me here.
I live I'm Michigan also. Typically I leave my 2019 Acadia denali in 2wd unless conditions warrant. But since I have the Active Suspension, when I put it in the Sport mode the suspension stiffens and it goes into 4wd. I bought mine so I could choose between either mode based on road conditions. Mileage would suffer a bit from the slight drag, if more components turning, and when it's active there's wear.
 

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I live I'm Michigan also. Typically I leave my 2019 Acadia denali in 2wd unless conditions warrant. But since I have the Active Suspension, when I put it in the Sport mode the suspension stiffens and it goes into 4wd. I bought mine so I could choose between either mode based on road conditions. Mileage would suffer a bit from the slight drag, if more components turning, and when it's active there's wear.
Sport mode is the most comfortable mode in my opinion. When I drive in any other mode, the Acadia bounces a bit.
 

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Doesn’t using just the 2WD save wear and tear on the AWD components?
That would all depend upon how AWD is decoupled from the drive train. Wear and tear still exists if things (axles, gears, shafts, etc.) are spinning while driving, regardless of whether or not they're stressed by applied power.
 

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The closest thing I've ever seen to an 'official' GM response was in an AutoBlog article when the author questioned a GM exec about the complexity vs gains of decoupling the AWD.

"Both all-wheel-drive systems employ a neat trick: a driveshaft that can decouple from the transaxle when the driver locks the Acadia in front-drive mode. This seemed like a lot of complexity for what was probably a limited efficiency gain, so I cornered Vehicle Performance Manager Larry Mihalko for the down-low. The number he gave me was smaller than I imagined: it's only good for a 0.5-mpg gain, roughly. Why employ this gadget at all? Mihalko gave me a look. "There's no low-hanging fruit left," he said. Engineers poke and prod the vehicles for every gram of weight loss or efficiency improvement that may help meet federal standards. If a half-mpg gain helps sell some increased number of Acadias, according to some GM formula, then the tech goes in. The driveshaft decoupler passed the test."

Here's the entire article: https://www.autoblog.com/2016/05/13/2017-gmc-acadia-first-drive-review/
Thanks for the link. This is the first non anecdotal evidence I've seen on the topic. ...... I've surmised from the article and various posts the following. I'd appreciate some validation.
  • Prior to '17 AWD Acadia's were FT AWD
  • the '17 added the drive shaft decoupler as a fuel savings device
  • I don't think any other drive train component was changed?
  • my conclusion is that using AWD FT is OK. - the service folks I spoke with are simply repeating the corporate rhetoric to support better MPG.
 

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On the new AT4, the rear differential is twin-clutched with computer controls. I believe that's the only significant change to the drive train.
 

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my conclusion is that using AWD FT is OK...
I've been driving 'full time' AWD/4WD vehicles since '95 across multiple brands and not one drive system failure or issue.

... the service folks I spoke with are simply repeating the corporate rhetoric to support better MPG.
Ding, ding, ding - we have a winner. (y)

Seriously, with the system engaged there has to be some additional wear and tear - the question should be 'what are the real world impacts of that?'.
 

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I've been driving 'full time' AWD/4WD vehicles since '95 across multiple brands and not one drive system failure or issue.
A transfer case bearing went out on one 4WD vehicle I owned (it wasn't full-time, either). That was a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Thanks for the link. This is the first non anecdotal evidence I've seen on the topic. ...... I've surmised from the article and various posts the following. I'd appreciate some validation.
  • Prior to '17 AWD Acadia's were FT AWD
  • the '17 added the drive shaft decoupler as a fuel savings device
  • I don't think any other drive train component was changed?
  • my conclusion is that using AWD FT is OK. - the service folks I spoke with are simply repeating the corporate rhetoric to support better MPG.
This is a good point, the drivetrain in the 17-19 is essentially unchanged. If there are no reported issues with the previous generation, seems like there's no real downside to leaving it in AWD when it feels right.

I think for my usage, summer and good weather I'll stick with the 2wd for the MPG's and some reduced wear, but I'm not going to sweat leaving it in AWD when conditions warrant it.
 

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I live I'm Michigan also. Typically I leave my 2019 Acadia denali in 2wd unless conditions warrant. But since I have the Active Suspension, when I put it in the Sport mode the suspension stiffens and it goes into 4wd. I bought mine so I could choose between either mode based on road conditions. Mileage would suffer a bit from the slight drag, if more components turning, and when it's active there's wear.
I find the Sport Mode offers a better ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I know the Sport Mode changes the shift points and engages AWD, but does it change anything suspension related?

I know some models have the adjustable suspension, but which? I imagine Denali for sure, but does it happen SLT models?
 

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I know the Sport Mode changes the shift points and engages AWD, but does it change anything suspension related?

I know some models have the adjustable suspension, but which? I imagine Denali for sure, but does it happen SLT models?
Sport mode won't make changes to the suspension unless the vehicle has "Adaptive Ride Control," a.k.a. electronic variable damping control. Electronic damping is an option - not something standard - on the Denali. Remember, AWD is also an option. It looks like "Adaptive Ride Control" is still not available on the AWD SLT according to the GMC website, BTW.
 

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...It looks like "Adaptive Ride Control" is still not available on the AWD SLT according to the GMC website, BTW.
I haven't looked at the build options for the '20 but up to model year '19 that was true - only available on the Denali as an option. I don't even think it was available on the 'All Terrain' trim.
 

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I haven't looked at the build options for the '20 but up to model year '19 that was true - only available on the Denali as an option. I don't even think it was available on the 'All Terrain' trim.
The site says it's not available on the AT4, either.
 

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I know the Sport Mode changes the shift points and engages AWD, but does it change anything suspension related?

I know some models have the adjustable suspension, but which? I imagine Denali for sure, but does it happen SLT models?
I have the auto-dampening suspension. In Sport Mode, the Acadia does not bounce as much. Sport mode offers a much better ride.
 
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