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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really love my truck!

You know how you baby that new car!?!

I hate that there are so many plastic gadgets, covers, clips, and surfaces that keep getting damaged, scuffed, scratched, cracked etc. I had several issues taken care of within 6 weeks of ownership.
I feel embarrassed bringing it in for trivial stuff. GM should be as embarrassed putting out this quality.
I hate that some buttons are soft to the touch, like the wipers, or the channel selector (want to hear what 3 screaming kids sound like when you change their tunes?).
Other buttons I have to hit so hard I wonder if they're working or not.

Professional Grade? My 3 year old Ford had over 70k when we traded her in , and we didn't even come close to the number of problems we had in 3 months with GM.
Oh, and we were so hard on that truck.
 

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Well, just to keep things balanced, I haven't found anything that I consider "cheap" plastic yet. Maybe the cover for the 115V outlet on the back side of the front center console, but that's very minor. I love the feel and the quality of my Acadia - and think that GM should be proud of putting this vehicle on the street. And I really love my truck, too.

IMO,

Smooth[/color] <><
 

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I agree with Smooth[/color]. I own Japanese, German, and American (one even built in Canada, eh?) cars. I've had most of them apart in one way, shape, form or another over the years. The 1988 Toyota Supra and Mazda RX7 (neither a cheap base model like a Corolla or 323) both have what I would say is the same type/quality of plastic that is in the interior as the Acadia and my 1991 Dodge Daytona and 1995 Pontiac Trans Am. The BMWs (1991/94 E34 5 series) are similar. If I had to make quality/design observations both ways:
Con
1) The soldering done on the electronics for the Toyota, Mazda and the BMW leaves a lot to be desired. Both cars are experiencing intermittent electrical failures that have been attributed to modules (Toyota= tail light monitor, Mazda= dash AC control, BMW= lamp and possibly ABS modules). This requires the re-soldering or replacement of the module. Incidentally, the dash units in the Mazda had their mounting ears )plastic) broken off, so they could not be reused.
2) The weatherstrips on the Toyota's targa top are poorly designed. When you drive in the rain or leave a carwash, as soon as you hit the brakes you get a stream of water on your pants leg. I replaced the strips and had the same thing happen, apparently you have to load the channels with silicone sealer. Sign of a poor design. My Trans Am has T tops and has never leaked.
3) The BMW door stops tend to wear out and the door will not stay open.
4) The plastic trim panel under one of the BMW dashes cracked and won't reinstall.
5) The Dodge hinges are worn on one door.
6) Keyless remote quit working on the Trans Am. Still diagnosing, not a high priority repair.
7) Both the Mazda and Toyota had cracks in their dashes from sun damage. I do think this would happen to any car that sat outside, but I have never seen one as large as the Toyota. I had to replace it with one from a 3 year newer car that still had smaller cracks in it. The Daytona is 3 years newer but I could tell it had also sat outside due to the leaves in it. The dash is OK on it, but I did crack a trim piece installing the security alarm.
8) The Supra 7MGE motor was famous for blowing head gaskets. Mine was no exception with like 70K on the odometer when I bought it, one reason why it was so cheap.
9) As much as I love the styling, the person that designed the motor placement on the 4th generation Camaro/Trans Am did no one any favors. The rear of it is tucked under the cowl, making service very difficult. The car should have been a few inches longer and wider. This was a big reason why I changed my next desired retirement car from a C5 Corvette to a Challenger.

That being said:
I have concerns over all the electronic gadgets used by the Acadia et al down the road a few years when the warranty has run out. Stuff like this is usually not cheap to fix. Most of it requires an expensive (around $4K as I recall) "Tech 2" tool to interface with the vehicle for diagnosis.

Pro
1) The Japanese platforms (Toyota & Mazda) are very well designed. The Toyota parts unique to a manual transmission car interchange directly with the automatic one, making a conversion easy. Mazda builds (built?) their cars with all wiring in place to add optional equipment like cruise control later.
2) The BMW doors close solidly, see above for a con on the door. The leather interiors have held up reasonably well, the rear seat on the 1991 is separating at the top due to sun damage.
3) Not totally relevant, but I've owned the same '65 Chevy Corvair for over 30 years. It is not an attractive car and I admit I've let it go after a body shop ripped me off for $3K and I lost interest and worked on other projects. The motor had the top end (cylinders and pistons) replaced in 1988. When we moved here 1.5 years ago, I had run it to put it on the trailer. It sat in a corner of the garage for over a year when I decided to do some cleaning this fall. I charged the battery for a few days and after a couple of minutes of intermittent cranking, it fired up & I drove it around. This car has to be about the most maligned car ever built by Detroit/GM- it doesn't say Chevrolet anywhere on it if this tells you anything.
4) The Dodge Daytona (this is my 2nd) has got to be the easiest car I have ever worked on. I've Frankensteined a double DIN navigation/Bluetooth radio, rear view camera, and remote start security system into it with really no difficulties. The 2.5L 4 cylinder turbo motor runs well and the car returns almost a 30 MPG average. BTW, the Acadia is now up to a 21.x average. :)

I think the plastics and other materials are the maker's ways of weight savings. It is interesting to consider my "compact" 1965 Chevy is about 2500 pounds, and has relatively thick sheetmetal as compared to newer cars. It also took up more room in the garage than a 2003 "full size" Impala I used before I retired. The dash panel is metal as well. The 1988 Mazda convertible is around 3000 pounds. The 1988 Supra and 1995 Trans Am are each around 3500 pounds. Having seen a burned one, I know the 93-02 Camaro/Trans Am is plastic from the nose to the rear 1/4 panels. The 2009 Challenger I'm looking at is around 4000 pounds. The Acadia is over 4000 I'm sure (don't know the weight off the top of my head).

All the mandated safety/smog stuff adds weight, so the makers try to save it where they can, because they have a double edged sword of mandated corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) to meet as well. Heavy cars are safer, but they burn more gas. I didn't mention my 1975 Datsun 280Z since it is still apart and I've only driven it onto and off of a trailer. The Datsun Z car faced the same weight issues due to mandated equipment (bumpers, side impact beams). Many prefer the early 240Z since it is the lightest of the models that were made through 1978.

In summary, I don't feel the Acadia is any "cheaper" inside than any of the other cars I own.
 

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What can I say. 1.5 years 25,000 miles. Not a scratched button, glitch, scuff, problem or recall repair. Not a driver of Mercedes or Bentleys here but this is a great quality car in my experience. If thats not professional grade, I do not know what is.
 

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I've had mine for 6000 miles with a 4 year old and 10 month old and a Cocker Spaniel and have yet to damage something on the Acadia. The dealer did mess up the finish on one of the leather seats but they replaced it. All of the buttons have positive feedback i.e. you know if you've pushed it to contact point or not, all of the knobs are very solid and I love the center stack. If you've driven a honda lately you know how miserable a center stack can be. Everyone that gets in my car compliments the interior and it is at least comparable to my brother's ML350 and my parents R350, both of which get way worse mileage with less HP and less room.
 

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I agree with the OP. I would not have paid this amount of money for the truck if I knew how poorly it is built. Just a couple of examples - the lumbar support handle broke on my driver's seat, I hear this most annoying rattling if I am driving on a less than perfectly smooth surface. I can't quite figure out whether it is coming from the center console or the front passenger seat. I have been meaning to bring it to the dealer for this, but I am pretty much expecting them to dismiss this as "can not reproduce"..Just given my previous experiences with them.
The big one was the transmission going out on the highway - didn't stall, but stuck in one gear. I was insane enough to actually drive it all the way home. As soon as I got home it stopped shifting alltogether. They fixed it though, so far so good.
Another interesting thing is the way the doors open - if I push a door open too hard it will bounce right back with some impressive force...I don't know how someone possibly could have thought that it is not dangerous. I make sure to open the doors for my kids every morning myself. Actually I 'll show it to the dealer next time I am there - maybe it is a defect. Couple more things I noticed - sometimes the stereo won't skip to the next song when I hit next on the steering wheel control - I have to repeatedly do this. A few times my power window controls would not work until 30 or so seconds after I turn the truck on. The MPG is not that impressive considering that speed demon it is not - 50/50 btwn highway and city - I get 16.5.
My most recent cars were Jeep Commander, 2003 Nissan Altima and 1998 Ford Explorer. The Explorer broke once after 50K or so - rear suspension had to be replaced, but overall I was happy with it. Jeep was ok, but I thought it was insanely inefficient (I don't know what made me think that acadia would be much better). I owned the Nissan for 4 years and I did not have to visit the service dept ever.
I suspect my rant could be just slightly off-topic, but the general gist of what I am saying is the same as the OP - professional grade it is not. AT this price level I will stick with japanese cars in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My gripe is that with 7 interior defects, & 1 exterior in the first 6 weeks. Just has me wondering what will break in the years to come.
My Mercury Mountaineer didn't see this many problems in the 3 years and 70K miles.
My girls are now older, a little more attentive, and I don't think they are applying brute force (rear seat belt retainers and seat trim)

1-rattle front A pillar, fixed by jamming a baby wipe between the rubber around door frame and A pillar cover
2-left side middle row, plastic housing under leather completely snapped off, clips were broken. Covered
3-center console has a slight gash in it, maybe I dropped my keys? Covered
4-seat belt retainers have snapped in rows 2 and three Covered, may not even bother going back a 2nd time.
5-shift knob chrome was not secured properly Covered
6- baby seat anchor covers snap off across the entire second row (3 - I think). Covered, parts never installed
7-Black plastic trim between windows. I polished out.

Yeah, But I still Love My Truck!!
 

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BrickLover said:
7-Black plastic trim between windows. I polished out.
Yeah, But I still Love My Truck!!
B-L,

I'm glad you still love your car! I have recently found a couple of hairline scratches in that black plastic also. What did you use to polish it out?

Smooth [/color] <><
 

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I have to give an account of my old 2000 Silverado compared to my Sister's 2000 Toyota Camry. I just traded in my Silverado for my new Lambda, begrudgingly though. It was an awesome truck!

The inside of the Silverado was "plasticy" but after 9 years of ownership, it still looked new! The dash on my Sister's Camry was cracking and pealing. Her door handles inside were also cracking. Her seats are weathered and fading. Get this: Her's is garage kept, my Silverado was NOT and lived 100% of it's life outside. The outside door handles on her Camry have also broken on the driver's door and on a back door. Her brakes needed the rotors redone at 60K, my truck never needed brakes at all during my ownership. Her brake's master cylinder broke last year and it took us weeks to get it fixed right. Changing the spark plugs on her car ended up in a slew of electrical issues that we still don't have fixed yet.

With the good experience of my old truck, and some other GM vehicles I or my wife have driven over the past 15 years, I expect the Traverse I have now to last a long time and look good while doing it. I do treat my cars extremely well, so I don't expect it to be very difficult. I think the plastic is a much stronger option than what other makers put inside their cars. Built to last, and I've seen that it does.

I also know that there is no car on the road that won't have some kind of issue in it's life. And, it's all fixable. A dealer might be able to do it, but they don't care nearly as much about your vehicle as you do. I feel unless I can't fix it myself, I don't need to be concerned with little details. Fortunately, with my GM vehicles I never had to worry.
 

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10 months, 10K miles later, Professional Grade...Yes...for me! Build quality is great, no issues so far.
 

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you are complaining about being cheap? sure a few things have broke, but at least it is the cheaper part. try buying a dodge...then you can complain. as for not having problems with a Jeep, you didnt keep it long enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Schram said:
you are complaining about being cheap? sure a few things have broke, but at least it is the cheaper part. try buying a dodge...then you can complain. as for not having problems with a Jeep, you didnt keep it long enough.
I can't expect things to last forever.
:uzi: Built Ford Tough....my battery, and the power seat > other than that, never saw
the service dept in 39months and 70K
My GMC all this and I barely had 2k on it when the cheap plastic started breaking down.
What will another 37K do? Hmmmmm........

I can't help but wonder.
javascript:void(0);
Mechanically I have a minor issue. Other than that.http://I still Love my GMC!
 

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brick, your link doesnt work. i think i will retract my idea that the acadia is the best. i was comparing it to my dodge, but when a compared it to our Aztek which we traded in...that thing never saw the dealer. we have had 7 minor complaints, yet i guess 7 is quite a few. still love the thing, best vehicle we have every bought.
 

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Let me preface this by saying that I love this vehicle. It looks amazing, is incredibly versatile and the mileage is good for how much cargo and people it holds BUT it certainly hasn't been maintainance free. My 07 SLE, AWD has had the following issues in the 40 000 miles since i got it:

1. Battery replaced cuz it went flat 4 times.
2. Vehicle won't start on an incline with anything less than 1/4 tank of fuel.
3. Driverside wiper came OFF in a driving rainstorm. Seems the nut hadn't been tightned down enough...
4. BOTH wipers stopped working one night in another driving rainstorm. The linkage rod disconnnected from the main wiper driver rod.
5. Lumbar adjuster keeps falling off
6. The entire drivers seat (power) 'jiggles' back and forth in many positions.

That's all that comes to mind at the moment. Certainly GM nailed the styling on this vehicle but they do have a QC problem. Since I've only ever owned GM's maybe this is less problems than other brands but it seems like a lot of issues for a 45k (can $$) vehicle.
 

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With all due respect for all opinions expressed as to whether or not the Acadia is "built Prof. Grade", this thread needs to die a sudden & certain death. Certainly we can all find something to complain about - but this thread has become something like a whiny kid with a runny nose.

How about we just focus our attention on something that yields a benefit to our forum readers - other than this never-ending "gotta get it off my chest" kind of thing. Oh yea, I don't like the location of the oil filter - but you know... Smooth - get over it.

Smooth[/color] <><

Preparing for a firestorm.
 

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I think it's helpful though for Acadia owners and possible owners to see these issues. It might be best to rename the thread to something a little more constructive, but there is some important information in the thread. I understand what you're saying about the complaining. But with the mindset that this is a product that's supposed to have a standard of quality. That standard comes at a very steep price. So these issues are very important with relation to the price. There is a standard, and it's good to know whether or not the product meets that standard. So I believe this thread can provide a benefit to forum readers. Not trying to argue, just state my perspective. I'm glad this thread was created-
 

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both smooth and 4LitreRR are correct. anyways, love this car and forum :thumb:
 

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This thread could be for all cars, my parents Honda Accord was a total pile of crap. They had it in for major repair 4 times in the first year, I'm not talking little stuff they had transmission and engine problems. So when people say they should have stuck with Toyota or Honda they could have ended up with the same piece of crap. BTW, we absolutely love our Acadia and wouldn't trade it for anything, well I would probably trade it for a new Camaro, but my wife would probably kill me.
 

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The fact is, reliability ratings for honda vs toyota vs GMC are on the order of
0.6 repairs/car/year vs 0.67/car/year vs 0.8/car/year.

So in 10 hondas, there are 6 repairs/year
in 10 toyotas, there are 7 repairs/year.
and in 10 GMC's, there are 8 repairs/year.

Although there is a difference, it is not much.
In fact I would say insignificant.[/color]
(based on JD Powers results for 2005 vehicles
tracked for three years 2005, 2006, & 2007)

http://www.cnn.com/2006/AUTOS/01/23/american_cars/
 
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