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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took my boat out for the first time since we got the Acadia. I was a little nervous - we choose the Acadia over some of the smaller SUVs like Highlander or Equinox because of the advertised towing capability so I was really hoping for the best. The boat and trailer are right about 3000 lbs.

I switched to tow mode and took off for the lake - only about a 30 minute drive. It felt real comfortable with the boat behind, I felt in control the whole time which is something I never felt with our previous SUV (S10-Blazer). The tow mode kept the transmission from overshifting nicely but I did notice that at cruising speed on a flat piece of road the tach was reading about 3000 rpm. That seemed pretty high to me considering the driving conditions. Seems like it should have shifted up a gear.

I stopped at the ramp and got out and noticed a smell - kind of like burning oil. It wasn't the 'new car' engine smell, at 775 miles I think that is pretty much gone. Also, as usual, the engine area was very hot.

Had a nice cruise on the lake, got the boat loaded up on the trailer to leave. Now for the moment of truth, this was a pretty steep boat ramp and I had these visions of spinning tires (FWD) and sliding backwards into the water. After I figured out the parking brake release (man that is really wierd!) I put her in gear and cruised right on up the ramp, no problems. That was really nice.

I gotta say I am really pleased with the towing capability. I was in control the whole time, power seemed decent even on some hills and the brakes stopped well. Not sure how it would do on a long haul but for my needs it was great.

The only thing I'm a little concerned about is the engine at high rpms at cruising speed. Anyone else seen this? Would it be better to shift out of tow mode at that point.

One last thing, the manual says to turn off park assist when towing. I was about to do that when I noticed the DIC saying that park assist was off. I know I didn't do it, so I guess the tow mode turns it off. Man they really thought of everyting.
 

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Mikiek,

Nice brief on your towing experience. I'd love to buy a FWD, but am still wondering about coming off the ramp when it's wet and maybe has some mud or something on it which makes it even more slippery. From what you recall, what were the conditions of the ramp you towed out on? Had it been used right before you (i.e. wet), was the concrete "formed" with horizontal texture as some are, etc.? I still own my old 1987 S-10 2.8 V-6. I towed a lot, but had RWD and limited slip diff. Never had trouble getting out - even in the worst cases. I used to drive in "3rd" up any hills or slight grades, but when cruising on a slight downhill where I wasn't putting a load on the engine I'd drop it to O/D and just let it wind-down a little. Certainly was underpowered, but did a reasonably good job for many years towing in 80-100 degree temps.

Thx,

Smooth
 

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well when the drive wheels have the waight of the engine on them they would have more grip that rwd, but all you need to do is shift to L and select 1.
 

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mikiek said:
The only thing I'm a little concerned about is the engine at high rpms at cruising speed. Anyone else seen this? Would it be better to shift out of tow mode at that point.
While in tow/haul mode, you have to get up to about 65 mph before you'll get into 6th gear. You could switch the button back to "normal" mode if you were driving under 65 mph and wanted to get 6th gear, but chances are you'd spend quite a bit of time in 5th anyway and it would probably shift between 5th and 6th quite often. The point of the tow/haul mode is to reduce shift busyness
 

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R-Thunder,

I agree that the engine weight would be helpful, however, with a tow vehicle on a ramp, I'd think that a bit more of the overall weight is "distributed" towards the rear of the vehicle - especially when you consider the dead-weight of the boat trailer on the hitch. Maybe I'd be OK on most ramps if I were mindful of the FWD, and took advantage of driving less than perpendicular to the water's edge. It's great to hear "real-life" feedback on various towing scenarios.

Thx for the feedback,

Smooth
 

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I've towed my 3800 pound boat/trailer a couple times. Pulling out the empty trailer (700 pounds) was no problem with FWD. Pulling it out loaded was a little more difficult but I did it. The grooved ramp was wet, mossy, the tide was extra low, the trailer wheels were past the concrete part of the ramp. I spun the tires quite a bit but with a few running starts, I got it up. It wasn't ideal but it worked. If I timed it better with the tides, I probably wouldn't have had much of a problem. On the road it seems to tow just fine. Fortunately, I keep the boat in the water year-round and only pull it out a couple times a year for cleaning and maintenance. I have no regrets about FWD, though AWD would clearly be the better performer in this application.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Smooth - My Acadia is FWD. The ramp I was describing has to be a 35-40 degree slope. It was damp but it's also deeply grooved.

With as much ease as it was to pull up that ramp I think it could have handled worse conditions. I agree with the posts about weight distribution, there is weight on the front end but there is also some in the rear. I just remember the last ditch trick of having the wife and kids sit up on the hood if I start spinning tires. That works pretty well.
 

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maintguy62 said:
I found when I plugged in my trailer the park assist shuts off.
It's designed that way; how annoying would that be to have the constant noise when putting your vehicle in reverse while towing
 
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