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100,000 sure looks like a great achievement, but in reality, it's like turning about 42-43 years of age: you're just starting to feel the effects of aging for the first time (maybe less flexibility, longer recovery from aches and pains, maybe your eyes are starting to go) ... but you're not "old", and nothing's really stopping you (yet).

But let's see if you're around at 85 !

Post back when you cross 200,000 miles. Then we'll salute you. But in the meantime, congrats on your vehicle reaching "mid-life"!
 

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100,000 sure looks like a great achievement, but in reality, it's like turning about 42-43 years of age: you're just starting to feel the effects of aging for the first time (maybe less flexibility, longer recovery from aches and pains, maybe your eyes are starting to go) ... but you're not "old", and nothing's really stopping you (yet).

But let's see if you're around at 85 !

Post back when you cross 200,000 miles. Then we'll salute you. But in the meantime, congrats on your vehicle reaching "mid-life"!
I'm 67 and only date lower mileage vehicles.....don't want one with the same aches and pains I experience :)
 

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If properly cared for, vehicles today can run for several hundreds of thousands of miles. Maintenance and non-aggressive driving are key.
My 30-year experience with my vehicles (multiple makes) has taught me the following:

1.) You have to be lucky enough to not end up purchasing a unit with a defective design or parts
2.) It's best to change your own oil and keep "other hands" off your cars.
3.) If you can achieve #1 and #2, a newly-bought vehicle should get to at least 100,000 miles problem-free
4.) If you achieve #1, #2, and #3, then you should get to at least 150,000 with only minor issues

But somewhere between 150,000 and 222,222 miles (my mileage goal with all my vehicles), you're probably going to develop a gasket leak somewhere that will require at least partial dismantling and a fairly costly repair (unless you can do the work yourself ... and then it's just relatively inexpensive parts).

I also think 222,222 miles on a vehicle achieved over 10-15 years is NOT the same thing as the same mileage over only 4-6 years. When you see people driving 30k to 50k per year, it's all highway miles. So those vehicles are NOT seeing the wear and tear associated with multiple season changes, potholes, etc. It's much harder to reach 300,000 miles under "normal" driving conditions. You have to drive it for 20 years
 

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Our 2012 Acadia rolled over 100,000 miles a few weeks ago. It's been a great car with only a few hick-ups here and there with all fixes found on this site. I agree with the comments regarding driving style, driving conditions and proper maintenance. Most cars these days can get to 200K and above before a replacement is eminent. I also drive a 2002 Audi A4 1.8T pushing the 300K mark. It has never been to a professional mechanic. Neither has the Acadia. I'm in my late 50s and my experience tells me that the weak link in most vehicles is the automatic transmission. I'm sure that if the 1.8T was mated to an automatic, it would have been in the scrap yard many years ago. Too bad manual transmisions are getting too hard to find in new cars. But electric cars are the future. Once the range and charging is improved, internal combustion engines will fade away. Not that I'm a Greenie or anything but engines are filthy things to work on.
 

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Still wondering where the "222,222 miles" came from? Just arbitrary or ?
Well, it started with “I’m gonna buy all my vehicles brand new and drive them 200,000 miles”. But then that number seemed too low, so I changed it to 222,222 ... the last time most people will see every digit show the same number on the odometer!

I’d love to make it to 333,333, but it’s just not gonna happen because once the vehicle gets rolled out of the “primary” slot ... the per-year mileage number decreases too much.
 

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Our 2012 Acadia rolled over 100,000 miles a few weeks ago. It's been a great car with only a few hick-ups here and there with all fixes found on this site. I agree with the comments regarding driving style, driving conditions and proper maintenance. Most cars these days can get to 200K and above before a replacement is eminent. I also drive a 2002 Audi A4 1.8T pushing the 300K mark. It has never been to a professional mechanic. Neither has the Acadia. I'm in my late 50s and my experience tells me that the weak link in most vehicles is the automatic transmission. I'm sure that if the 1.8T was mated to an automatic, it would have been in the scrap yard many years ago. Too bad manual transmisions are getting too hard to find in new cars. But electric cars are the future. Once the range and charging is improved, internal combustion engines will fade away. Not that I'm a Greenie or anything but engines are filthy things to work on.
I know that manual transmissions probably last longer than automatic transmissions. However, I frequently drive in bumper-to-bumper traffic for 2-3 hours for 26 miles (suburb to downtown). A manual transmission is too painful for my leg in those traffic conditions.
 

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I know that manual transmissions probably last longer than automatic transmissions. However, I frequently drive in bumper-to-bumper traffic for 2-3 hours for 26 miles (suburb to downtown). A manual transmission is too painful for my leg in those traffic conditions.
Agreed, heavy stop and go traffic will make the use of a manual tiresome. I've owned V8 (diesel and gas) pickups with manuals and they can cause the left leg to dread pushing in the clutch even in the best conditions. So automatics have freed us from the burden of having to focus on the task of selecting the correct gear constantly. I commute about 30 miles one way to work choosing back roads over the 18 mile commute using the congested interstate. It's about the same commute time of ~45 min using either route. To further this discussion, I simply choose to have my 4 bangers mated to an manual, 6 cylinder and above have more torque for the automatic. Most 4 cylinder vehicles and automatics just don't seem to mate well. I recently drove a 2010 Ford Escape with the 2.5L automatic. A perfect example of what I'm describing.
 

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Agreed, heavy stop and go traffic will make the use of a manual tiresome. I've owned V8 (diesel and gas) pickups with manuals and they can cause the left leg to dread pushing in the clutch even in the best conditions. So automatics have freed us from the burden of having to focus on the task of selecting the correct gear constantly. I commute about 30 miles one way to work choosing back roads over the 18 mile commute using the congested interstate. It's about the same commute time of ~45 min using either route. To further this discussion, I simply choose to have my 4 bangers mated to an manual, 6 cylinder and above have more torque for the automatic. Most 4 cylinder vehicles and automatics just don't seem to mate well. I recently drove a 2010 Ford Escape with the 2.5L automatic. A perfect example of what I'm describing.
I find that side roads are more pleasant than a crowded interstate. And I end up arriving in the same amount of time.
 
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