GMC Acadia Forum banner

1 - 20 of 69 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now have 4K on the odometer and we just took it on a nice long trip from Amarillo to Albuquerque and back. With a mix of highway, flat and hills, and some city driving, four adults, two kids and our bags, we averaged 21 MPG. Much better than the 14 my wife has typicaly getting around town. Things are looking better for the mileage. :cheers:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,870 Posts
Yeah this vehicle is definitely suited for the open road
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We will see how it does going back east (OBX) this summer. Should be even flatter open roads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I've been concerned about mileage too. I've noticed that in car magazine road tests of the Acadia, they seem to be doing worse relative to EPA compared to other cars/trucks. All vehicles go through the identical EPA test, but it makes you wonder if GM has figured out how to "game" the test better than other car makers! My wife gets 15mpg around town, but that's all short trips with lots of stop and go and idling, which kills mileage in any car. But a big part of it is also how you drive (keep reading for more on that).

On the bright side, I averaged 25mpg on the highway portion (55-65 speed limits, keeping it below 70 everywhere) of a recent 250 mile road trip family vacation, which is great, especially considering mine is 4wd (2009 SLT2). I have also averaged about that same mileage in medium to light suburban traffic because I do some mild hypermiling. To those who don't know, hypermiling is driving in a way to maximize mileage. Hypermilers often get a bad rap for drafting trucks (which most don't do), and driving too slow, but my approach, especially in city driving, is to do it in a way that doesn't impact travel time at all. In a nutshell: light acceleration, keep highway speed down, and, a big one, *coast up to stoplights!*. Look way ahead, and start coasting if you see you'll have to stop anyway. You'd be amazed how far a car will coast from say 40mph, especially in neutral. Even if the light just changed green, look at how many cars are stacked up and factor in the delay before the last car will start moving. "Advanced" techniques involve anticipating a stale green, coasting in neutral (you coast farther), turning the car off when stopped for more than 10sec, and lots more, but if you just keep your acceleration light and coast up to stops instead of keeping your speed up and braking harder and later, you'll see a nice improvement in mileage. Yeah, people stream past, sometimes changing lanes from behind me for that last little burst of throttle, before stopping at a light that I saw was green 10 seconds ago. Then I roll up next to them a little bit later, and we both leave the light together. Repeat that light after light, and I'm getting 5-10mpg better than the guy in the Acadia next to me on the same road making the same time.

In case anyone is wondering, I'm not *that* old of a fart (I'm 39) and have a Z06 Corvette that I race (autocross) competitively. No, I don't exactly hypermile the Vette, although I do coast up to stops because it just feels wrong not to. My daily driver is a 2002 Saturn that I used to get low 20's mpg and now get 33-35mpg in a mix of city/hwy driving. It's rated at 21/30mpg.

Anyway, I've been wondering how much better an Odyssey would do, driven in the same conditions and the same way (hypermiling or not). I love the look of the Acadia and how it drives, but sometimes I feel like better mileage, more cargo/people capacity, and convenient sliding doors make the Odyssey a smarter choice in some ways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
sam919 said:
In a nutshell: light acceleration, keep highway speed down, and, a big one, *coast up to stoplights!*. Look way ahead, and start coasting if you see you'll have to stop anyway.
I do this on my short 7 mile drive to and from work. Max posted speed is mostly 35 MPH with a one mile section at 40 MPH. I always impress myself when I turn onto my street or work parking lot that I'm mostly even with the same cars I started the journey with but who have zoomed away at every stop light. A few times I've gone the whole seven miles without even using the breaks. So save gas and saving brakes too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,374 Posts
I guess either our Acadia is a gas guzzler or Mrs. Blue has a lead foot. :) When I drove it this week, the average MPG was 19.0. When I filled up my 5.7L Hemi powered six-speed Challenger last week, it had averaged 20.3 on the prior tank (I reset at fill up).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I don't understand the MPG readings. I drove from Salt Lake to Boise at 80 MPH and got 24.5 MPG with about 1000 miles on the car at the start of the trip. From there, I drove to Portland, OR driving around 70 MPH. I'd think I'd get better gas mileage because I was driving slightly slower, but no, I got 19 MPG.

On the return trip home, I got about 19 MPG pretty much the whole way. Now driving around town, I'm getting 15 MPG when I used to get 16.5 MPG when the car was brand new. I thought the MPG was supposed to get better as you put more miles on it, but mine seems to be getting progressively worse. I guess it could be all of the different gas stations I used along the way and of course elevation changes, wind differences, etc. However, I hope my MPG start to go back up, rather than down.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,374 Posts
There are a lot of variables involved over distances- you've named several. Terrain is a big one, always lower going up & down hills vs. flat terrain. Driving one direction for an extended period can be helped or hurt by the wind so long as it is consistent. Was the load (passengers, luggage, etc.) the same for all trips?

These numbers are not always apples:apples. My numbers are for mildly rolling hills with a FWD Acadia in a mix of usually 80% highway and 20% city driving. Someone in similar terrain with the same driving pattern with an AWD will probably get slightly less MPG, and someone with an AWD on flat land will likely get more.

Even between the two of us, I usually average at least 1 MPG better in the Acadia due to my driving habits, one more variable for the mix.

For a comparison to be valid, it has to have the circumstances as similar as possible, and this rarely if ever happens in the real world.

I noted tonight ours has dropped to 18.x in a week due to more local driving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,233 Posts
I get 25MPG on open road with relative flat terrain. Stop and go of course much less but still terrific in my opinion for a 5,000LB vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Tire pressure helps my Acadia out gas millage. The dealer insists on keeping the tire pressure should be 33lbs per tire every time I have an oil change. I find I get better millage when I set the tire pressure to 40lbs per tire. The problem I have with 33lbs is on a cool or cold day the low tire pressure light comes on because the tire pressure fall blow 30bls. Of course the light goes off when the tires warm up after a few miles driven. At 33lbs the steering feels heavy to me and the ride feels to soft and spongy. At 40lbs the steering is light and responsive and the ride is firm.

I have a 74 miles round trip commute to work. My commute is a mix of highway and city driving and I average 22mpg. Pure highway driving I have gotten as high as 25mpg and tooling around the city with lots of stops and idling I have gotten as low as 15mpg. I can understand peoples frustration at the MPGS of the Acadia. Any small fluctuation in driving habits seem to send the mpgs up or down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,233 Posts
MichAcadia said:
Tire pressure helps my Acadia out gas millage. The dealer insists on keeping the tire pressure should be 33lbs per tire every time I have an oil change. I find I get better millage when I set the tire pressure to 40lbs per tire. The problem I have with 33lbs is on a cool or cold day the low tire pressure light comes on because the tire pressure fall blow 30bls. Of course the light goes off when the tires warm up after a few miles driven. At 33lbs the steering feels heavy to me and the ride feels to soft and spongy. At 40lbs the steering is light and responsive and the ride is firm.

I have a 74 miles round trip commute to work. My commute is a mix of highway and city driving and I average 22mpg. Pure highway driving I have gotten as high as 25mpg and tooling around the city with lots of stops and idling I have gotten as low as 15mpg. I can understand peoples frustration at the MPGS of the Acadia. Any small fluctuation in driving habits seem to send the mpgs up or down.
40 sounds high - wonder how that will impact treadlife. I try to stay around 35 or so but the temp change in the winter definitely makes the TPMS annoying.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,212 Posts
I keep our tires between 38 and 40 psi cold. Less than that, like Mich wrote, the handling feels spongy and sloppy.

This may be a stupid question for jason, but how often do you reset the AVG MPG reading? If the DIC is not reset every so often, any city driving will quickly drag down the avg mileage reading.

Also, one other variable to those Blue listed is fuel. If you run E10 fuel (10% ethanol), your fuel mileage will generally be less than pure gasoline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
mikemu said:
40 sounds high - wonder how that will impact treadlife. I try to stay around 35 or so but the temp change in the winter definitely makes the TPMS annoying.
I have been running 40 psi for eight or nine months about 14,000 miles now and the tread is wearing evenly. The max tire pressure according the side wall is 44psi so I'm running under the max psi and over the recommended psi for comfort and mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
The wife is getting around 21 MPG's in combo city/highway driving (60 miles round trip) and think that's pretty good. We will be taking a trip to California in late July and hope to get 25 or better. I wonder if the higher elevation in CO. lets us get better mileage? We only have 85 octane whereas everyone alse has 87.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
alvam said:
The wife is getting around 21 MPG's in combo city/highway driving (60 miles round trip) and think that's pretty good. We will be taking a trip to California in late July and hope to get 25 or better. I wonder if the higher elevation in CO. lets us get better mileage? We only have 85 octane whereas everyone alse has 87.
Engines make less *peak* power at high elevations because of the lower density of the air, but with the mass air flow sensors that have been in use in cars for some time now, I believe elevation might not impact mileage at less than full-throttle driving. I've even heard the same argument about dirty air-filters, that engines make less peak power with a dirty filter because of reduced peak airflow, but under light/medium throttle, the engine just meters the fuel based on the air intake, whatever it is. 85 octane, on the other hand, seems like it could hurt mileage. I'm not saying that >87 helps... but if the engine is retarding timing (to prevent knock) due to <87 octane, that could hurt efficiency. It depends on what the engine was designed for.

But I'm wondering... and I apologize if this was discussed on here before... does anyone have any reference with real world mileage under the same driving conditions from a minivan, like the Odyssey? As I mentioned in my original reply, in car magazine tests, I've noticed that the Lambdas seem to get worse mileage, relative to their EPA ratings, than other cars in the same test. So even though a FWD Acadia is 17/24 vs. 17/25 for the Odyssey, which would suggest similar real world mileage, does anyone have a firsthand mileage comparison with a previous minivan, or maybe a friend's/neighbor's/relative's minivan that you could share? I've been second-guessing my decision to buy my 2009 SLT-2 due to mileage, roominess, and convenient sliding doors. I decided I'm pretty ok with the minivan image, but not until *after* we bought the Acadia.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,212 Posts
sam919 said:
So even though a FWD Acadia is 17/24 vs. 17/25 for the Odyssey, which would suggest similar real world mileage, does anyone have a firsthand mileage comparison with a previous minivan, or maybe a friend's/neighbor's/relative's minivan that you could share? I've been second-guessing my decision to buy my 2009 SLT-2 due to mileage, roominess, and convenient sliding doors. I decided I'm pretty ok with the minivan image, but not until *after* we bought the Acadia.
I'm not sure how relevant my info is as our Odyssey was a 2002 model. Both our Acadia and Odyssey get/got between 16-18 mpg in city driving (both essentially nailing the EPA estimates). However, on the highway we never got over 22 mpg (usually around 20-21) with the Odyssey, while our Acadia routinely gets 23-25 mpg (again hitting the EPA numbers for the GMC). Most of our highway driving is between 65-75 mph. I will say that it seems that headwinds/tailwinds have a larger effect mileage-wise on the Acadia (negatively/positively respectively) than on the Odyssey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
GeoHawk said:
I'm not sure how relevant my info is as our Odyssey was a 2002 model. Both our Acadia and Odyssey get/got between 16-18 mpg in city driving (both essentially nailing the EPA estimates). However, on the highway we never got over 22 mpg (usually around 20-21) with the Odyssey, while our Acadia routinely gets 23-25 mpg (again hitting the EPA numbers for the GMC). Most of our highway driving is between 65-75 mph. I will say that it seems that headwinds/tailwinds have a larger effect mileage-wise on the Acadia (negatively/positively respectively) than on the Odyssey.
Thanks for the reply. I'll bet a current generation Odyssey would do better than your 2002, especially highway, due to the VCM (cylinder deactivation under light load) and the other typical efficiency improvements over time. Nevertheless, a good data point, anyone else?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
HAve a 2009 Acadia SLT ---was getting 14.5 -15 MPG at the beginning , now have 3,000 miles and seems to be going up (around 17mpg mixed). I have noticed that the RPM's are around 1900 to 2000 at 70-75MPH vs 2200 at 65MPH . Have not taken a full highway trip yet but hoping for a 23-25 MPG -----We'll see
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,233 Posts
mdg said:
HAve a 2009 Acadia SLT ---was getting 14.5 -15 MPG at the beginning , now have 3,000 miles and seems to be going up (around 17mpg mixed). I have noticed that the RPM's are around 1900 to 2000 at 70-75MPH vs 2200 at 65MPH . Have not taken a full highway trip yet but hoping for a 23-25 MPG -----We'll see
Lower RPM at higher speed? ??? I do lots of highway driving and typically get roughly 25 mpg.
 
1 - 20 of 69 Posts
Top