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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been suffering with an annoying "Low Tire Pressure" warning on my info display. It has been occurring ever since the weather cooled off. It says that the pressure on all four tires is low (27 or 28 PSI usually). The tires do not have leaks or damage. The pressure is just low due to the cold weather! After driving for 30 minutes or so, they warm up and the warning goes away.

Anyone else having this problem? Kind of a dumb oversight by GMC. Is there some way to turn off monitoring of tire pressure? Probably not a good idea if so. Any other suggestions?
 

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It is common to adjust your air pressure in winter & summer to adjust for changes in temperature and expansion / contraction...

If your tires were checked and filled in summer...they will be low all winter unless you adjust them for the cooler temperatures...and the opposite for summer...they will be over-inflated...

Even though the warning turns off when the tires warm up, they will still be a lower pressure than recommended...and they will not reach the temperatures and pressure of running warm or hot on a summer day...

I had the same issue with mine...and about 5 lbs of air each brings them back into range. The TPMS system signals a change in pressure when there is a change of 10% to 15%.
 

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If your pressure is 27-28 before driving, then you should get the warning as your tires have low pressure. I have the 18" tires and they are to be 35 before driving. Typically when driving, the pressure will increase to 37-39. Look in your drivers door jam to see what your car's pressure should be.

This annoying "Low Tire Pressure" warning is a safety feature to let you know you need air in your tires to be safe. Get the tires to the correct pressure an the warning will go away.
 

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My Acadia has been giving me the same warning occasionally since the colder weather has settled in. I will eventually get around to putting more air into them. It's just so **** cold out and I don't have the patience to be messing around with it in cold weather.

Oooo I just had a thought. Maybe I'll call the dealer today, since it's in the shop, and see if they can put some air in my tires. :thumb:

Anyway, I hardly find the warning to be annoying. In fact, it definitely helped me out over the summer when my tire was flat. Is it because I have an SLE that it doesn't actually tell me how much air is in my tires? It just tells me when they are low and which one is low.
 

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Ted,
Low tire pressure when it's cold means you have low tire pressure. Period. The point of the feature is to let you know that you have a condition that YOU need to do something about. To ignore the warning is an oversight on your part, not GMC's. To blame GMC in any way is a bit like shooting the messenger.

Web,
I have an SLE and OnStar sends me updates each month by e-mail as to the psi in each tire. I've checked and the readings they send me ar spot on.

Maybe it's just me, but adding air to my tires when the cold weather sets in seems as natural as having to wear a coat. It's just one of those things ya gotta do.
 

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rudykizuty said:
Web,
I have an SLE and OnStar sends me updates each month by e-mail as to the psi in each tire. I've checked and the readings they send me ar spot on.

Maybe it's just me, but adding air to my tires when the cold weather sets in seems as natural as having to wear a coat. It's just one of those things ya gotta do.
Oh yeah, I get the monthly emails from OnStar. I just thought that these people who were posting their individual tire pressures actually got them from their Acadia's DIC.

And um, I've actually never added air to my tires in the winter to compensate for the cold weather. Never even gave it a thought. Of course, I never had a tire pressure monitoring system in my vehicle to reprimand me about it either. :-\
 

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TeddyOH said:
I have been suffering with an annoying "Low Tire Pressure" warning on my info display. It has been occurring ever since the weather cooled off. It says that the pressure on all four tires is low (27 or 28 PSI usually). The tires do not have leaks or damage. The pressure is just low due to the cold weather! After driving for 30 minutes or so, they warm up and the warning goes away.

Anyone else having this problem? Kind of a dumb oversight by GMC. Is there some way to turn off monitoring of tire pressure? Probably not a good idea if so. Any other suggestions?
It's not really an oversight. Like everyone else here has posted, your tires should be inflated close to the tire pressure placard number when "cold" (i.e. before driving). This means whether its 80 degrees outside on the morning of July 15, or 15 degrees outside on the morning of January 15, you should have your tires inflated to whatever that pressure is (somewhere around 35psi). This means adding/releasing air from the tires when the weather conditions change as your tires will lose 1-2 psi of air with every 10 degree drop in temperature.
 

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What GM should really come up with is a tire pressure monitoring system that not only lets you know when the air pressure is low, but allows the tires to suck in air to get it up to the right pressure or, likewise, releases air to adjust tire pressure. ;D
 

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Web Raven,
I think the HumVee H1 Alpha has an onboard air compressor that does just that! But I think we could buy @ 3 Acadias for the price of 1 HumVee H1! :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, I guess I get the point. I realize the cold pressure is low, but there is absolutely no way for me to keep it at optimum pressure. It's not as simple as adjusting the pressure in the summer and winter. I live in New Orleans, and it is usually very warm year round. There are certain weeks that it does cool off, which is when this problem arises. Unfortunately, it will be 75 today and 55 tomorrow. I don't think it's practical to adjust tire pressure day to day or week to week. I'm not sure what I'll end up doing. Maybe get the pressure adjusted once to optimum on a cooler day this month, and just roll with it.
 

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Like you said, checking/adjusting the tire pressure on the coolest day will be your safest bet, Teddy. That way it will be more likely that your tires will be slightly overinflated rather than underinflated when the temperature changes. Significantly underinflated tires will generate excessive heat that can lead to premature tire failure, hence the tire pressure monitoring system. It is better to error on the side of overinflating them as long as the maximum cold tire pressure listed on the sidewall of the tire is not exceeded (I think that is usually around 44 +/- psi on most passenger car and light truck tires).

This all came about from the Ford Explorer tire blowout problems. I believe Ford spec'd a 30 psi recommendation for the Explorer (Firestone btw recommended no less than 35 psi I believe) to provide a softer ride. Well, since many people don't check their tire pressures regularly they ended up riding around in a 5000 lb, top heavy vehicle on tires inflated to 20 psi or less. This led to the tires overheating and failing causing the blowouts and subsequent crashes and rollovers.
 

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I think the term here is that the majority of us have been living in a world where "ignorance is bliss". Prior to manufacturers starting to put in TPM systems, most of us (me included) just took our tires for granted and as long as they were extremely low at a visual glance, then we didn't even have a second thought about the tires or what may be optimal for them. This is exactly why TPM systems are starting to become common place now. Due to safety and conservation issues, I'm really happy that I will be alerted when my tires aren't inflated appropriately, just like I like have a temp gauge to show me that the engine is over heating or a check engine light to alert me that something else needs to be checked into.
 

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TeddyOH said:
Maybe get the pressure adjusted once to optimum on a cooler day this month, and just roll with it.
Sounds like a plan. That's what I would do. Good luck :thumb:
 

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I have always had to adjust tire pressure in the fall and spring to compensate for the seasonal temperature changes. Tire pressure will also change with altitude, so if you set the pressure at sea level and take a trip to 5000 ft you will see changes. Tirerack.com has several informative articles on tire pressure
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=73&currentpage=38
 

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With all my previous vehicles, I got in the habit of checking tire pressure with every 3rd fill up (when I checked the oil level). Constant checking does two things; you're always aware of any problems like slow leaks or improper pressure (which drastically changes the dynamics of the vehicle), and you can avoid any potential problems without risking driving around on a potentially risky tire.

Think about it for a second here - out of all the safety features on the modern vehicle, there are only 4 small patches of rubber actually connecting you to the road. So why have all the warning lights for check eingine, low oil, etc... and not be bothered to check the tires? $10 bucks on a decent gauge and a few minutes a month.

Seriously, a few thousand moving parts can't be expected to just keep working without keeping an eye on some things. You cannot tell me that you do not have 2-3 minutes at least once a month to check your tire pressure. And if you have a SLT or modified SLE DIC, you can do it from the seat!
 
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