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Buying tires and the right tires just takes being informed and the web is fill with a lot of good info on these tires.

Tires are like people and each is a little different. Some may have different names but are virtual twins since they are made by the same company with different names.

The key it to understand the tire and the role it is to play as some have tread more for wet and snow. Others are tuned more for quiet and some try to do both to limited degrees.

Tires are very miss understood items on a vehicles as for near a century they were just rubber balloons that held air, Wore out fast and were easy to get a flat with. Many old cars had more than one spare as flats were that common.

Today tires while they still hold air and are still assembled by hand. have come a long way, Understanding compounding and the tread design is key.

For example the Assurance line of Goodyear tires has a number of different variations. They have the comfort tread for quiet and ride, Triple tread for weather and more touring, weather ready for more extreme weather needs, Fuel Max that keys on more MPG or on electric cars they can add miles to the charge. I think they have a few more. They also sell some variations under the Kelly name and Dunlop.

Michelin does the same thing as just look at how many Pilot tires they offer. Bridgestone with the Dueler tires.

This same name crap just makes it more confusing for some. Tire Rack tries to make some sense of it by educating the customer.

You have a ton of choices and for many these are expensive decision's.

Being my family for several generations were involved in the tire industry and my self indirectly I have gotten discounts and even some free tires. That was fun my father worked for Goodyear and the head of the BFG TA group gave me a free set of Comp Ta radials for my car. Dad was ok with that but I worried having a competitor in the house but for free he was good with that. But anyways I understand these are tough choices due to cost and they need to do their home work.

Buying the right tire is like buying the right tool for a job. You don't want a pair of vice grips for a lug nut.
 

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We had some Yokohama tires on IIRC, our last minivan. Dang they were noisy too! Horrible tires.
There are some brands I shy away from, some I'm not even completely sure why... Kelly is one of them.
Do some research online, trusted reviews (if there are any), go from there.
My B-I-L bought some Kelly tires on the recommendation of his local chain tire shop. He had them on his truck for only about 18 months and the side walls and tred started to develop cracks all over. He waited a few months and saw they were getting worse and worse.
He took the truck in and the dealer apologized and said he had heard some customers had the same issue.
He was told it may have been a bad batch of rubber compound.

It could happen with any brand, but who knows.

Now some tires are difficult to get or a longer wait due to supply issues like other things.
 

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My Denali came with Bridgestone's and they were a real problem. One failed road force on balance so they replaced it under warranty at the first service. The replacement had a vibration until the day I replaced them all. A friend visited with his new Explorer that had Michelin Primacy and that's what I went with even though they weren't listed as an option. Those tires have been excellent and are wearing well at 20k miles on them. Just my two cents...
 

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Why are you looking at 255/50-20? That’s going to throw the speedometer off substantially.

Yesterday I replaced my original Michelin Premier LTX with Continental CrossContact LX25, in the original 235/55-20 size and 102H load/speed. (They are also available as a V rated tire but that’s a silly trade off for a crossover.)

So far I’m very happy. Slightly quieter than the OEM tires, and significantly more comfortable ride. Much higher snow/ice ratings from TireRack. Also they start at 12/32” tread depth unlike the Michelins starting at 9.5/32”. And the cherry on top is they are made in the USA.

Im not anti Michelin but the Premier and Primacy have not been the best tires they’ve come up with. If you must go Michelin and willing to have a little tread noise the Defender LTX is a better choice.
 
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2020 Acadia Denali, Ultimate Package, Technology Package, Towing Package, White Frist Tricoat
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After reading all the comments on this thread and considering I drive a 2020 Acadia Denali with factory mounted Michelin Primacy tires on it, I decided to do a little research on replacement options. After a couple of hours of serious reading, the hands-down all-season winner seems to be the Michelin Crossclimate 2. Not only does it have rave reviews on tirerack.com, it's rated #1 by Consumer Reports in the Premium All-Season category. Excellent wet and dry traction and braking, excellent snow traction, very good ice traction (it's not a snow tire) and OUTSTANDING treadware (CR tested to 85000 miles). The only thing that is rated fair is the rolling resistance, but that is something that you sacrifice with increased road grip. I'm pretty sure I know what the next set of tires on my Acadia will be!
 

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The Michelin CrossClimate 2 is very well reviewed! That aggressive tread pattern pays dividends in bad weather performance, especially in snow/ice. Here’s what TireRack said about them:

“Tread noise was very competitive for a Grand Touring All-Season tire, exhibiting a low-volume, even white noise at a slightly higher pitch than the other tires in our test. Even at varying speeds on smooth asphalt roads, the CrossClimate² managed to harmonize the noise from the tread pattern into a consistent tone. This impressed our team, especially considering the tire earns the 3PMSF symbol.”

I went with the CrossContact LX25 because they give up some winter traction but give you dead silence. I can’t hear any tread noise/whine at ANY speed and I’m very sensitive to car noises. To me that was a good trade off. Others may gladly take a “low volume white noise” in exchange for more aggressive grip. It’s all engineering trade offs of course.

Both are excellent choices depending on needs/preferences.
 
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