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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put an order in at the dealership (which is 2 1/2 hours away) almost two weeks ago. They indicated that they would be driving the vehicle down to my house. So, when the Acadia gets to my house, it will have 160 miles on it (all highway miles). I obviously don't want that to happn. I was thinking of paying them a bit more...to put it on a flatbed truck and drive it to my house. My main concern is that some stranger is going to be driving my new car 160 miles before I even take ownership of it. Not to mention, that GM says the following about the AWD Acadia...

From Owners manual:

New Vehicle Break-In
Notice: Your vehicle does not need an
elaborate break-in. But it will perform better in
the long run if you follow these guidelines:
• If you have all-wheel drive, keep your
speed at 55 mph (88 km/h) or less for
the first 500 miles (805 km).
• Do not drive at any one constant speed,
fast or slow, for the first 500 miles
(805 km). Do not make full-throttle starts.
Avoid downshifting to brake, or slow,
the vehicle.
• Avoid making hard stops for the first
200 miles (322 km) or so. During this time
the new brake linings are not yet broken
in. Hard stops with new linings can
mean premature wear and earlier
replacement. Follow this breaking-in
guideline every time you get new brake
linings.
• Do not tow a trailer during break-in. See
Towing a Trailer on page 371 for the
trailer towing capabilities of your vehicle
and more information.
Following break-in, engine speed and load can
be gradually increased.

How would you go about and ask the salesman that you want it shipped on a flatbed truck?
 

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I would guess they would be happy to do that for you as long as you are willing to pay the incremental cost.
 

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Even though it's 2 1/2 hours away, I think I'd actually go pick it up. I'd want to look it over before taking possession of it.

However, if you definitely don't feel like going to pick it up, I would voice your concerns to your salesman about a complete stranger driving your brand new vehicle 160 miles to your house and mention that you'd be more comfortable with it being delivered on a flatbed truck. It's YOUR Acadia. If you don't speak up for it, nobody else will.
 

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Web Raven said:
Even though it's 2 1/2 hours away, I think I'd actually go pick it up. I'd want to look it over before taking possession of it.

However, if you definitely don't feel like going to pick it up, I would voice your concerns to your salesman about a complete stranger driving your brand new vehicle 160 miles to your house and mention that you'd be more comfortable with it being delivered on a flatbed truck. It's YOUR Acadia. If you don't speak up for it, nobody else will.
+1. Rent a car and go pick it up. Inspection before taking delivery is very important.
 

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Don't take possession of that car until you've had the opportunity to inspect it. Figure out a way to get there and pick it up.
 

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Most dealers have a way of transporting vehicles via a trailer, as there are lots of customers that don't want the extra miles on a new car they are about to buy if the dealer has to make a vehicle trade with another dealer. They usually charge a nominal fee for this as a tow vehicle is going to use more fuel, but a it's pretty common occurrence.

Your dealer is going to have to drive 2 vehicles anyway (yours and one to get back in) to deliver yours, so it shouldn't be a big deal for them to trailer it down to you, instead. Just ask and offer to pay a few $ for the extra gas.

Just FYI, most of the drivers I've seen that dealerships use to transport cars are ~70 year old retirees that are very conscientious about it.
 

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I purchased my Acadia from a dealership 175 miles away. They had an older gentleman drive it to me, which is very customary for most dealerships around here. I know he could have overdone it, but my guess is he was even more careful than the normal person because it was somebody else's car.

I worried about it for 2 seconds before he left the dealership, but that was it. If it really bothers you, pick it up yourself or pay to have it trailered to you. If you are paying for the trailer/driver, the dealership won't mind a bit.
 

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fenwah - I'm like you, I don't want a stranger, who doesn't care about my expensive car, one that you're likely to own for a long time, breaking it in for me. No way: break-in is important, especially on an AWD. Just do a one way rental! it only cost us $51 & we dropped their Impala out in the sticks!
If all brands of rentals are represented in your drop-off location, price shop. If it's a small town drop-off, like ours, check on-line yellow pages to see who rents in that market, then shop them.

Shipping, or trailering is much more expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is an email I just sent to the salesman.

xxxxx,

I have a concern about the transportation of the Acadia from the dealership to my house. The Acadia has the following information in the user manual about "breaking in" the car. It states the following:

New Vehicle Break-In
Notice: Your vehicle does not need an
elaborate break-in. But it will perform better in
the long run if you follow these guidelines:
• If you have all-wheel drive, keep your
speed at 55 mph (88 km/h) or less for
the first 500 miles (805 km).
• Do not drive at any one constant speed,
fast or slow, for the first 500 miles
(805 km). Do not make full-throttle starts.
Avoid downshifting to brake, or slow,
the vehicle.
• Avoid making hard stops for the first
200 miles (322 km) or so. During this time
the new brake linings are not yet broken
in. Hard stops with new linings can
mean premature wear and earlier
replacement. Follow this breaking-in
guideline every time you get new brake
linings.
• Do not tow a trailer during break-in. See
Towing a Trailer on page 371 for the
trailer towing capabilities of your vehicle
and more information.
Following break-in, engine speed and load can
be gradually increased.

How much trouble would it be to put in on a flatbed truck to ship it down here? I would think that it would be more cost effective to drive it down on a flatbed truck using only one employee instead of two, and only use the one vehicle to drive it down, instead of two. This would obviously save gas money as well as employee man hour costs.

In the past, I have always had vehicles shipped to me with a flatbed truck. Previous dealerships had always indicated the reasons I listed above as well as getting the vehicle to the customer with the fewest miles possible on the odometer.

Would you please discuss this with your sales manager and let me know if this would be possible?


Thank you.
 

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I'd be more afraid of them 'following' the break-in instructions.

The break-in period IN MY OPINION ONLY is for the protection of the parts before the warranty expires.

I believe, and have always followed, my own break-in period..... full throttle, all gears, beat the crap out of it right from the start. I'm probably wrong, but don't bother flaming, I'm not going to change my mind. My first brand-new vehicle ever, was 2001 GSX-R600 motorcycle. I did the break-in by-the-book. All it got me was an underpowered sluggish engine, with lots of problems after about 20,000 km. My mechanic suggested the full-throttle approach, I have done that with every bike and car purchased new since then. I've had powerful engines, and problems seem to appear before the warranty ends... so like I said above, this is only MY OPINION, and I'm likely WRONG.. but the point is, no one is going to drive my brand new vehicle for the first few hours of its engine life.

You need to drive that vehicle to break-it-in however you choose, not how the stealership chooses.
 
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