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MClady88 said:
They took beating (in mileage and sometimes in physical hits) and held up way better than other car manufacturers I have seen. I've seen super expensive import cars crumple under wrecks that our GM cars only got minor "flesh wounds". My husband's Trailblazer just got rear ended HARD and only light cosmetic damage -very impressive results ;D
Apples to oranges.... The GM Vehicles you had may have all been full frame vehicles (not uni-body) and that is typically the reason they do not crumble during collisions. This is actually not a good feature (in most situations) since the frame transfers the collision force into the human body causing severe damage during a major collision. It is nice to have a frame during a minor collision (less visible damage) and when hitting a much smaller vehicle (not great for the smaller vehicle) but generally uni-body vehicles are safer.

You sacrifice the vehicle to save yourself with a uni-body design.

Very similar to a motorcycle helmet, you destroy the helmet during one crash and save your head. A full frame vehicle would be similar to wearing a concrete helmet.
 

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I am so sorry you feel that way based on your current situation with the Acadia, jrc50. General Motors takes comments like this very seriously, and I have documented your concern along with your comments. This allows the departments within General Motors to read them. We, General Motors, relies heavily on loyal customers and I hope one day we may be given the opportunity to earn your business again.

Michelle, GMC Customer Service
 

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Nvr2loud said:
Apples to oranges.... The GM Vehicles you had may have all been full frame vehicles (not uni-body) and that is typically the reason they do not crumble during collisions. This is actually not a good feature (in most situations) since the frame transfers the collision force into the human body causing severe damage during a major collision. It is nice to have a frame during a minor collision (less visible damage) and when hitting a much smaller vehicle (not great for the smaller vehicle) but generally uni-body vehicles are safer.

You sacrifice the vehicle to save yourself with a uni-body design.

Very similar to a motorcycle helmet, you destroy the helmet during one crash and save your head. A full frame vehicle would be similar to wearing a concrete helmet.
While the concept of the car being designed to crumple leaving the passenger compartment intact is correct, a unibody design doesn't automatically make it safer. My '60 Thunderbird is a unibody design but if I was going to be in a crash, I'd take any modern vehicle of any size or frame design over my 4,000 lbs T'bird any day because the T'bird wasn't designed to crumple in any particular way. I imagine the few full frame vehicles still for sale (full sized trucks & SUVs mostly) have frames designed to crumple in a way to protect the passengers as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
vogelm1 said:
So 3 posts by the original poster (2 were essentially duplicates) and they're gone. They either just had to vent/genuinely had bad luck with the Acadia, or there was trolling going on...especially when their handle is "Acadias r junk". :shrug:
I'm not a 'forum junkie' like some. I come to this site when I'm trying to find a solution to an issue I'm having with my Acadia. Unfortunately, that happens multiple times a year. But you are right about the venting part. I'm finally at a point that I decided to join the forum to let others know my experiences and opinion about the Acadia after 4 years of ownership.

I have owned many cars that I've driven over 250,000 miles - Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Lexus. None of them had anywhere close to the problems my Acadia has. Even as I write this my Acadia is 'dead' in my driveway. It's got too many issues that I just can't afford to get it repaired again, only to drive it for a few months before having another breakdown. Yes, I'm fed up at this point.

Btw, talked with a neighbor (older woman about 70) about her Acadia, she said she liked it... but has already had to have the transmission replaced.
 

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salguod said:
While the concept of the car being designed to crumple leaving the passenger compartment intact is correct, a unibody design doesn't automatically make it safer. My '60 Thunderbird is a unibody design but if I was going to be in a crash, I'd take any modern vehicle of any size or frame design over my 4,000 lbs T'bird any day because the T'bird wasn't designed to crumple in any particular way. I imagine the few full frame vehicles still for sale (full sized trucks & SUVs mostly) have frames designed to crumple in a way to protect the passengers as well.
Good points about the uni-body design, every year the vehicles get a little bit safer (generally). I would trust a 2012 uni-body a lot more then a 2002 uni-body.

Pickup trucks are still not great during a major collision, they are designed to haul heavy loads and are too rigid and strong to collapse properly. They are great when hitting a smaller vehicle, not so good for the passengers of the other vehicle :(
 

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Acadias_r_Junk said:
I'm not a 'forum junkie' like some. I come to this site when I'm trying to find a solution to an issue I'm having with my Acadia. Unfortunately, that happens multiple times a year. But you are right about the venting part. I'm finally at a point that I decided to join the forum to let others know my experiences and opinion about the Acadia after 4 years of ownership.

I have owned many cars that I've driven over 250,000 miles - Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Lexus. None of them had anywhere close to the problems my Acadia has. Even as I write this my Acadia is 'dead' in my driveway. It's got too many issues that I just can't afford to get it repaired again, only to drive it for a few months before having another breakdown. Yes, I'm fed up at this point.

Btw, talked with a neighbor (older woman about 70) about her Acadia, she said she liked it... but has already had to have the transmission replaced.
Just like I stated earlier, you have a lemon, and I'm very sorry to hear that... but your situation isn't the normal situation and that really sucks for you, I have sympathy.

My 'lemon' was a Honda Accord, most people don't believe me... but it was junk and eventually I stopped repairing it and scrapped it. I took the roof off my self with a zip cut. I picked up the car with a forklift through the doors... felt wonderful, but it cost me a lot of money. I could have sold it for a few thousand even with the blown engine in the end, but it felt better to destroy it.
 

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Yes you do have a lemon... You should never buy a car in the first few years of production anyway, but they, on an average, only have problems every 20-30k mikes or so. Although more than what wed hope, your every few months into the shop still means you have e lemon. Not all acadias are as bad as yours(for example, your neighbor's), but there are some common problems with the older Acadia model years.
 

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Nvr2loud said:
Good points about the uni-body design, every year the vehicles get a little bit safer (generally). I would trust a 2012 uni-body a lot more then a 2002 uni-body.

Pickup trucks are still not great during a major collision, they are designed to haul heavy loads and are too rigid and strong to collapse properly. They are great when hitting a smaller vehicle, not so good for the passengers of the other vehicle :(

I have multiple hours per year designed just to stay up on the ever changing collision repair end of vehicles. Compairing your 1960's unibody vehicle to late model Uni-body vehicle is like compairing a Car to a Vacuumn, because they both have wheels. Vehicles today are more complicated than ever to repair, High Strength Steel, Ultra High Strength Steel, Boron Steel, Aluminum and I could go on for hours on this rant. :beer:
With the current Cafe rules in place to achieve better fuel economy, weight, and still continue to protect the passangers. Unibody vehicles are a different vehicle than a full Frame vehcile, like previously stated, they are designed to tow or pull 15-28K Lbs. There is just no way to do that with a Uni-body vehicle Period. Unibody vehicles can withstand some pulling, I belive the Acadia is rated for 3-4K if you have the SL-2 Package.
Since the 1960's vehicles have become increasively heavy due in part to additional safetly devices(airbags, Traction Control< ABS and the like). Thes life saving devices add weight to the vehicle, to get the increased fuel economy or CAFE requirements, the Uni-body has become increasingly lighter. Your compairison to a 1960's vehicle is not fair, and a slap in the face to folks like me that put a very high standard on an industry that has been very good to me over the years.
:banghead:
 

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Jeffrey98335 said:
Your compairison to a 1960's vehicle is not fair, and a slap in the face to folks like me that put a very high standard on an industry that has been very good to me over the years.
:banghead:
How was anything that was said a slap in the face to those that work on the vehicles? ??? It was a discussion on the progression of vehicle frames over the years. Obviously the methods needed to repair these vehicles has required changes and significant training.
 

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Jeffrey98335 said:
I have multiple hours per year designed just to stay up on the ever changing collision repair end of vehicles. Compairing your 1960's unibody vehicle to late model Uni-body vehicle is like compairing a Car to a Vacuumn, because they both have wheels. Vehicles today are more complicated than ever to repair, High Strength Steel, Ultra High Strength Steel, Boron Steel, Aluminum and I could go on for hours on this rant. :beer:
With the current Cafe rules in place to achieve better fuel economy, weight, and still continue to protect the passangers. Unibody vehicles are a different vehicle than a full Frame vehcile, like previously stated, they are designed to tow or pull 15-28K Lbs. There is just no way to do that with a Uni-body vehicle Period. Unibody vehicles can withstand some pulling, I belive the Acadia is rated for 3-4K if you have the SL-2 Package.
Since the 1960's vehicles have become increasively heavy due in part to additional safetly devices(airbags, Traction Control< ABS and the like). Thes life saving devices add weight to the vehicle, to get the increased fuel economy or CAFE requirements, the Uni-body has become increasingly lighter. Your compairison to a 1960's vehicle is not fair, and a slap in the face to folks like me that put a very high standard on an industry that has been very good to me over the years.
:banghead:
I didn't compare anything to a 1960's vehicle :shrug:

I simply stated that 'generally' uni-body vehicles are designed to crumple to protect the passenger compartment while absorbing collision forces. I also stated that steel-framed vehicles are designed for heavy duty use for towing and hauling and therefore are unable to crumple like a uni-body design. I do feel that the newer vehicles are much safer, there is no comparison from 50 year old technology, even 10 year old technology is out-dated compared to new vehicles.
 

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Jeffrey98335 said:
Unibody vehicles can withstand some pulling, I belive the Acadia is rated for 3-4K if you have the SL-2 Package.
Acadia, Outlook and Traverse are rated to tow 5,200 with the tow package, available on all trims. Earlier models were only 4,500. The new Durango, also a unibody I believe, I think can be equipped to tow 7,500.

Jeffrey98335 said:
Your compairison to a 1960's vehicle is not fair, and a slap in the face to folks like me that put a very high standard on an industry that has been very good to me over the years.
I mentioned my unibody '60 T'bird, but not favorably to newer designs. I said I'd take a hit in any modern car over one in my T'bird because of just the improvements you mentioned.
 

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None of the criticism here is misplaced. Shortly before I met her my wife purchased a new 2008 that has produced an endless stream of problems including multiple traction control issues, engine cover leaks, A/C leaks, and rear hatch closure issues, just to name a few. While the oil has been changed religiously, last week the low oil pressure indicator came on so I had it towed to the dealer. They found water in the oil and informed me it needs a new engine . . . All this with less than 100k miles. Run, don't walk, away from these vehicles.
 

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Movinguy said:
None of the criticism here is misplaced. Shortly before I met her my wife purchased a new 2008 that has produced an endless stream of problems including multiple traction control issues, engine cover leaks, A/C leaks, and rear hatch closure issues, just to name a few. While the oil has been changed religiously, last week the low oil pressure indicator came on so I had it towed to the dealer. They found water in the oil and informed me it needs a new engine . . . All this with less than 100k miles. Run, don't walk, away from these vehicles.
b.s.! I have TWO of these and they have been the best built, most reliable and safest vehicles we have EVER owned! All you idiots with your AGENDAS (either because you are paid trolls from other manufacturers or are just flat out jerks) need to be banned from our forum!
 

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No one is going to get banned for stating their opinion with regards to the vehicle. Everyone has the opportunity to state their experiences with the vehicle and post them here.
 

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Movinguy said:
While the oil has been changed religiously, last week the low oil pressure indicator came on so
But did you check the oil level often between oil changes?
 

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rbarrios said:
But did you check the oil level often between oil changes?
Yes, after it began leaking oil through the engine cover quite early on, I began checking it frequently.

Discovered something else last night . . . The dealer reiterated that we should have only used 5W30, preferably synthetic. However, looking back through the service records, they at various times used 10W40 and 20W50 (unless they invoiced it incorrectly).

And no, I am not an idiot, nor a paid troll. In fact, I work for Toyota's North American engineering organization, and gladly give kudos to other automakers when they raise the bar on quality. That is not the case here . . .
 

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hmmmm- you should bring it to their attention... the oil snafu that is

If they say-- ohh thats a typo...

well tell them--- thats on you...
now replace my engine...
 

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rbarrios said:
hmmmm- you should bring it to their attention... the oil snafu that is

If they say-- ohh thats a typo...

well tell them--- thats on you...
now replace my engine...
X2 what he said!
 

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@Acadias_r_junk -- There is some good news....at least you didn't plunk down your hard-earned money for a 2012 nightmare.

Johnny
 
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