GMC Acadia Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife took the Acadia in to the dealer for an oil change and tire rotation. Dealer said the front pads are worn down to within a 1000 miles of replacement. There are only 20K miles on the vehicle and the bulk of that driving is highway.

Of course, pads are not covered under warranty!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Acadianer said:
My wife took the Acadia in to the dealer for an oil change and tire rotation. Dealer said the front pads are worn down to within a 1000 miles of replacement. There are only 20K miles on the vehicle and the bulk of that driving is highway.

Of course, pads are not covered under warranty!
First please don't anyone take this the wrong way. If you can check the brakes yourself or have someone else recheck them this is the first step. If you are having it done tell them you want the old parts. You can even ask to see a new set of brake pads to compare them too. I am always looking out for someone who might be taking advantage of a woman bringing a vehicle in for service. My wife thought she had problem with her car .She pulled in to a repair shop. They said they ordered a part. The minute she walked away from the shop to get a soda the part had came and was installed.$50 dollars. I checked the car when she came home,nothing was touched. She had be ripped off. She had a puddle of antifreeze under the car but it wasn't from her car. You should be hearing a scrapping squeal from the warning sensors on the brake pads if there that low also.
Everyone drives different so it is hard to tell how long brakes will last. Todays dealer shops are also trying to make as much money as they can to keep the place going. Most mechanic have to sell to earn. The brakes might be needing replacement soon but not right away also. I hope I didn't confuse you. Let us know how you make out.

Bobby
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
Pads are wear-n-tear items. Fronts usually wear out first. I believe there is a low probability of a mechanical problem existing if both front pads wear down evenly. Typical pads should last around 50K - depending on driver and stop and go traffic routine. 20K is defiinitely early.

They are actually quite easy to change out...but I haven't tried it on the Acadia. Kinda like changing the oil or air filter...a monkey can do it...but not everyone likes being a monkey...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jake_99 said:
They are actually quite easy to change out...but I haven't tried it on the Acadia. Kinda like changing the oil or air filter...a monkey can do it...but not everyone likes being a monkey...
So you have not replaced the pads in an Acadia nor do you know how they are replaced (who knows what gotcha's are waiting for the unwary!). Jeez, I have replaced pads on almost everything--try a Porsche sometime. I hate to be negative to a post, but either supply useful information or stop posting.

So now we have the question, how hard is it to replace front pads on an Acadia? Please find out and post back here.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,875 Posts
Acadianer said:
Jake_99 said:
They are actually quite easy to change out...but I haven't tried it on the Acadia. Kinda like changing the oil or air filter...a monkey can do it...but not everyone likes being a monkey...
So you have not replaced the pads in an Acadia nor do you know how they are replaced (who knows what gotcha's are waiting for the unwary!). Jeez, I have replaced pads on almost everything--try a Porsche sometime. I hate to be negative to a post, but either supply useful information or stop posting.

So now we have the question, how hard is it to replace front pads on an Acadia? Please find out and post back here.
If you "have replaced pads on almost everything" then why are you asking for our (forum members) assistance?
People are commenting on your situation, the better thing to do, rather then find out how easy they are to replace, is determine if they actually need to be replaced as DeForger mentioned.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,374 Posts
Disk brakes? Haven't worked on a Porsche yet. :)

I've adapted four wheel GM "E" body (Eldorado/Riviera/Tornado) calipers and rotors along with power assist to a '65 Corvair.
I put larger Corvette C5 calipers & rotors onto a '95 Trans Am (front) and 98+ Trans Am calipers & rotors on the rear.
Recently put larger BMW 8 series single piston calipers onto the front and thicker 540 rear calipers/rotors on my '94 525.

We have several members that have access to various GM systems such as parts and service that could more than likely supply an exploded diagram of the braking setup to assist with this issue.

However, making comments demeaning members, you'll likely get no help here, which is what you were asking for in the thread title. This discourages anyone that has the information you need from posting what you need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
Acadianer said:
Jake_99 said:
They are actually quite easy to change out...but I haven't tried it on the Acadia. Kinda like changing the oil or air filter...a monkey can do it...but not everyone likes being a monkey...
So you have not replaced the pads in an Acadia nor do you know how they are replaced (who knows what gotcha's are waiting for the unwary!). Jeez, I have replaced pads on almost everything--try a Porsche sometime. I hate to be negative to a post, but either supply useful information or stop posting.

So now we have the question, how hard is it to replace front pads on an Acadia? Please find out and post back here.
1) Take off the front tire...since you've replaced pads on almost everything, you should know how to do this
2) Take the caliper off of the disk rotor...since you've replaced pads on almost everything, you should know how to do this too...

Very quickly you'll discover if GMC has done something - totally illogical - to complicate a very simple procedure...and, with your own admission as to capability - this whole process would take 15 minutes...and in doing so, can evaluate for yourself the level of wear, which, you can quickly identify as to need...if you agree with reported wear level...

3) Unclip the old pad
4) replace with new pad
5) repeat steps with other front tire...since you know to replace both...because you've replaced pads on almost everything...

So, please let us know what you find...after all, you've replaced pads on almost everything...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,208 Posts
Acadianer said:
My wife took the Acadia in to the dealer for an oil change and tire rotation. Dealer said the front pads are worn down to within a 1000 miles of replacement. There are only 20K miles on the vehicle and the bulk of that driving is highway.

Of course, pads are not covered under warranty!
What exactly are you asking help for?
I can almost guarantee, your brakes are not worn at 20,000 miles, unless you
ride with your foot an the brake pedal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Jake_99 said:
Acadianer said:
Jake_99 said:
They are actually quite easy to change out...but I haven't tried it on the Acadia. Kinda like changing the oil or air filter...a monkey can do it...but not everyone likes being a monkey...
So you have not replaced the pads in an Acadia nor do you know how they are replaced (who knows what gotcha's are waiting for the unwary!). Jeez, I have replaced pads on almost everything--try a Porsche sometime. I hate to be negative to a post, but either supply useful information or stop posting.

So now we have the question, how hard is it to replace front pads on an Acadia? Please find out and post back here.
1) Take off the front tire...since you've replaced pads on almost everything, you should know how to do this
2) Take the caliper off of the disk rotor...since you've replaced pads on almost everything, you should know how to do this too...

Very quickly you'll discover if GMC has done something - totally illogical - to complicate a very simple procedure...and, with your own admission as to capability - this whole process would take 15 minutes...and in doing so, can evaluate for yourself the level of wear, which, you can quickly identify as to need...if you agree with reported wear level...

3) Unclip the old pad
4) replace with new pad
5) repeat steps with other front tire...since you know to replace both...because you've replaced pads on almost everything...

So, please let us know what you find...after all, you've replaced pads on almost everything...
Actually you forgot a couple things. Before you can put the new pads back over the rotor, the bleeder needs to be opened and the caliper cup pressed back into the caliper for the new pads to fit over the rotor when you reinstall them. You will either need very large channel locks or the proper tool to press the cups back into the caliper. Not everyone will have either of these tools.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,374 Posts
To compress the pistons, I like to use a 1/8" piece of flat steel and a C-clamp. Cut the steel to length, put it across the piston, and tighten the clamp. Makes for a uniform force across the piston. The special tools to do this rely on a similar principle, although most I've seen press against the opposite side of the caliper while the screw part presses on the piston.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
JLF said:
Actually you forgot a couple things.
Anyone doing it for the first time, I would recommend a a more definitive guide. I would wager that this is close enough...

http://www.autozone.com/addVehicleId,2967202/initialAction,repairGuide/shopping/repairGuide.htm?pageId=0900c1528009f0ab

I've never had to bleed the brake fluid in the past, just open the brake fluid resevoir. There is a potential for spillage if the resevoir is over full, but the resevoir should be large enough to allow for flush pistons without bleeding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Jake_99 said:
JLF said:
Actually you forgot a couple things.
Anyone doing it for the first time, I would recommend a a more definitive guide. I would wager that this is close enough...

http://www.autozone.com/addVehicleId,2967202/initialAction,repairGuide/shopping/repairGuide.htm?pageId=0900c1528009f0ab

I've never had to bleed the brake fluid in the past, just open the brake fluid resevoir. There is a potential for spillage if the resevoir is over full, but the resevoir should be large enough to allow for flush pistons without bleeding.
Opening the bleeder is a safer way of compressing the caliper piston back in its bore. With antilock brakes comes control valves that can be damaged or have contaminates pushed back thru the brake lines in to these valves. Just a bit if advice that may save someone a headache. Plus this way you get a little fresh fluid in the system too. I to have just opened the master cylinder and pushed the piston in ,but I now always open the bleeder.

Bobby
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Offensive post removed, thread locked, & PM sent. Please refrain from making insulting remarks towards other members.

Blue[/color]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,875 Posts
Acadianer said:
Oh yeah, I consider the Acadia a woman's vehicle. That could also be why I haven't seen a useful post here.
:angryfire:
Wow your really trying to make friends here. :eek:hno: :sosad:
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top