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I was listening to a computer talk show on the radio and the expert said there are two kinds of consumers: the 10% who are passionate about the technology and the other 90% who are buying it solely for the utilitarian value. Compare that to a car-buyer who likes to tinker; fine-tune and track down the most minute disatisfaction vs the person who buys a car to be a comfortable one and haul people and things around.

I think we see most of the former type on the forum. And because of that we tend to see so many complaints about the Acadia. There are valid, major problems that are noted and I am not underestimating them or the true grief they cause the owners. But many of the complaints do appear to be whining or misconception of what the Acadia was built to do or simply not reading the owners manual.

Reading the complaints and problems gets to be depressing after awhile. I got my truck in January and the forum has been extremely helpful for me to get to know my Acadia and to find aftermarket items. I have contributed to all of the polls and offered suggestions to seekers. However now that I have spent about 15 hours on the forum, I think I should back off from daily/twice-daily checking to, perhaps once a week or so, or when I need some advice. I wish I would have spent time on the forum while I was deciding to buy the truck. I recommend this to anyone - to get on the forum for the vehicle you are considering buying to know what to expect -- mileage, ride, maintenance considerations, etc.

To put things in perspective, I googled to find forums for other vehicles -- Ford, Chrysler, Nissan, Toyota, MB, etc. -- and, you know, they all report a lot of problems too. Some of the forums seem to be controlled by the manufacturer so you have to factor that in.

In summary, we forum members are probably much more discriminating and passionate about our vehicles than the average consumer and we will tend identify gliches that most people would not even see or consider important. Again, don't get me wrong, I'm not unsympathetic with forum members who are having real difficulties with performance and service.
 

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Those that are having problems are looking for solutions. In our society, usually hear from those that express their unhappiness and what to do. That is what these forums are for, give comfort to those that need for there are 99.999999% that are thoroughly happy with our vehicles. Right?
 

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teetertotter said:
Those that are having problems are looking for solutions. In our society, usually hear from those that express their unhappiness and what to do. That is what these forums are for, give comfort to those that need for there are 99.999999% that are thoroughly happy with our vehicles. Right?
Right!
 

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Right! Very well put. :cheers:
 

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I think you hit the nail right on the head. Yes the Acadia has had some problems and to those who have had them it is a major pain in the rear, but the vast majority of Acadia owners have not had lemons or any problems at all. These are complicated vehicles and there will be glitches now and then. They are mass produced in the thousands and a bad one will be produced now and then.
 

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Sports car forums may have some of the most passionate people. And similar to this forum, a lot of problems get brought out, probably to some manufacturer's dismay. For example, people on the Camaro/Firebird forums started to see issues with the Comp Cams "R" lifters, which led to finding out the clip design had changed. I unfortunately found this out a little too late and had a failure. Comp Cams of course denied any issues with them and claimed they were being used in the wrong application where the user didn't set them up properly.
 

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Lagunasrfr,
that was a good post and addressed issues of which we may not have been aware.
However, from my personal perspective, having owned a number of GM products in the past, I think what raises the most concern among consumers are the repeated flaws and unnecessary quality control issues that many other manufacturers avoid. Most people, in my opinion, prefer to buy American, support the economy and their fellow citizens here at home. But the products developed and manufacturered in the United States these days lack the same quality as some European and Asian makes. I don't think that is a concidence. And regardless of an individuals stand on patriotism, it's unlikely that he or she is willing to drop $35K - $40K of hard earned money on a vehicle that lacks the quality of a competitor just because it is American made. Perhaps at one time that might have appeared to be unpatriotic. But, the consumer and the manufacturer always take the "bottm line" into consideration. :(

I was unwilling to buy American again for the past 20 years because of poor quality of the vehicle from both GM and Ford. I have owned 2 Pontiac Trans Ams, 1 Cheverolet Monte Carlo, 1 Dodge Challenger, 1 Oldsmobile Regal, 1 Mercury Grand Marquis, (all between 1969 through 1986) each kept for an average period of three years, and all had some significant problem (electrical, panel fit and body integrity, water leaks to the interior, blown engines, cheap interior cabin parts, transmission and drive train, you name it . . .). I got tired of the same issues each time, not to mention the totally dismissive, disrespectful, and indifferent attitudes of both the dealership sales staff and service personnel AFTER sale. :mad: ::)

I took my business to BMW and have been there for the past 20 years (with the exception of 1 Dodge Durango with awful rear end problems and suspension issues; 1 Dodge Grand Caravan for my wife that had numerous electircal issues). And through the BMW's (2- BMW 3 series, 2 -BMW 5 series) I have always been pleased with their products and their service. There have been few, if any, problems with any of my BMW's. I was amazed at how their personnel responded to problems that occasionally occurred. But the basic product was sturdy, well constructed, outstanding quality and tastefully appointed, with options that made sense, albiet expensive in some instances. :D

I decided, admittedly, that I was going to return to GM because of the potential of the GMC Acadia. It looks good, and depending upon what you read and how you interpret the data, it looks like the ultimate vehicle for my particular needs - provided that it does what they claim it will do (minus the many fixes and issues). :-\

In short, I need the space for my five member family, I like the options and appointments offered, and am hoping against hope that all of the recalls, fixes, TSB's and other items are addressed before I actually take delivery.

Barring that, I am at the mercy of a group of UAW factory workers, who may or may not have had a good day when they assemble my Acadia. Let's hope they are in a good mood on that faithful day. ;)
 

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Most people, in my opinion, prefer to buy American, support the economy and their fellow citizens here at home.

You didn't buy American, you think Americans want to support each other? Why then is Toyota kicking *ss and collecting money? Good thing that was just an opinion. I don't blame you for not buying American after having so many car issues. Why anyone would buy a Dodge is beyond me, they are the cheapest built cars out there, you are just asking for proplems there. The price reflects that in comparison to other American vehicles. I wish you well, but maybe BMW and Volvo are the only vehicles you should get, we all know they are the best in the world with the least problems.
 

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Volvos have gone downhill! (I would NEVER buy another) No car maker is perfect!
 

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BMW's and Mercedes have also been having some real repair issues. The engines and transmissions on some of the 7 series are having to be rebuilt before 100,000 miles. The 3 and 5 series are better. A popular BMW magazine is recommending not buying any BMW that has had only the factory supplied free maintenance. The magazine states that "service intervals have been extended far too long and failure of engines, transmission, and rear axles are being seen with mileages over 50,000 miles. Vehicles that have had traditional service as recommended in the past are not having the same problems, except some 7 series.
 

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But still basically most foreign makers have a much better "basic" package than the domestic brands in terms of quality and refinement in agreement with what Detnick stated, coupled with great post sales support from both dealership and manufacturer in servicing and addressing issues, its no question why people become loyal to these brands....

when your asking me to buy American to support American --- that line has been blurred for a long time!!! The upcoming European Ford Focus and Fiesta, which are way ahead of the current models in terms of overall design, will never be built in America but in Mexico.... hows that for supporting the American Economy? :mad:

BTW im not concern about forum overload, it will be a concern if everyone decided not to post anymore..... ;D
 

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In response to the post by SioXie.
That was a good point and something that I failed to focus on. The fact that American based manufacturing is sending jobs abroad or to Mexico, while at the same time touting the purchase of products in the United States. The greed is totally unbelievable, and sad. These companies are undermining the very foundation of our economy just to improve their bottom line.
It doesn't help that some of our workers do little to improve the perception that American companies, especially their automakers, are more concerned about profit rather than the satisfaction of the customer. If they were really concerned about the stability of their jobs perhaps they would take more care in how they construct these vehicles and how the dealerships actually make their sales. This should include after sale service as well.
Of course these companies are in business to make money, but isn't there a moral component to all this? Shouldn't they consider trying to keep some of these job in the US? This constant slow "bleed" of jobs and opportunities is ruining the fabric of our society, forcing many of us to make decisions about big ticket items that we would normally not have to make. (Sorry about the rant).

So, I am going to try this on "faith" and support GM (at least this particular model) and hope that I will be one of those lucky people who bought a trouble-free Acadia.
 

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detnick said:
In response to the post by SioXie.
That was a good point and something that I failed to focus on. The fact that American based manufacturing is sending jobs abroad or to Mexico, while at the same time touting the purchase of products in the United States. The greed is totally unbelievable, and sad. These companies are undermining the very foundation of our economy just to improve their bottom line.
It doesn't help that some of our workers do little to improve the perception that American companies, especially their automakers, are more concerned about profit rather than the satisfaction of the customer. If they were really concerned about the stability of their jobs perhaps they would take more care in how they construct these vehicles and how the dealerships actually make their sales. This should include after sale service as well.
Of course these companies are in business to make money, but isn't there a moral component to all this? Shouldn't they consider trying to keep some of these job in the US? This constant slow "bleed" of jobs and opportunities is ruining the fabric of our society, forcing many of us to make decisions about big ticket items that we would normally not have to make. (Sorry about the rant).

So, I am going to try this on "faith" and support GM (at least this particular model) and hope that I will be one of those lucky people who bought a trouble-free Acadia.
The American automakers have been unprofitable for years, and you are calling them greedy? Unbelievable. GM lost about $45 BILLION from 2003-2007. Yep, greedy pigs. ::)
 

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The American automakers have been unprofitable for years, and you are calling them greedy? Unbelievable. GM lost about $45 BILLION from 2003-2007. Yep, greedy pigs. ::)
Perhaps greed was not the correct way to describe the business practices of the larger automakers, GM in particular. GM should be able to make a reasonable profit for the products that they make. In fact, as I'm sure you are aware, GM was second to none in quality products and in customer relations. And, although I had heard about huge losses by GM I admit to not giving it a great deal of thought. However, one should consider those losses in the proper context (if they posted such huge losses, how is it that they are still in business?) This is not an argument about profit vs loss. This is about how their current business plan overall affects the buying public, and how that reflects on the overall condition of the corporation.
One still has to wonder how they find themselves in the financial box that they are in and don't understand how they got there. One could make the general argument of poor management, changing economy, devaluation of the dollar, the national deficit, the foreign trade deficit and the price of oil. Those factors effect the bottom line and management considerations of all large corporations in the global economy, especially those in manufacturing. No one is arguing that those issues don't have considerable influence on how a company does business.

My position is that regardless of what you do or make for the consumer, your approach, interaction, quality of product and reputation go a long way to secure a loyal customer base. If you allow that base to erode for reasons that are under your control, then you are ruining your own business. It may not be evident at first, but give it time.

Case in point: When did it become normal or accepted that when you buy a brand new vehicle that you have to be concerned more about TSB's, recalls, misc. defects in workmanship and detail, quality of product lines from suppliers, and a whole host of other tangible issues, instead of having a reasonable amount of confidence that your particular purchase will be problem free? Why do we have to buy from GM on faith . . . and hope?
 

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:thumb: well said Detnick, couldnt agree more..... ;D
 

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Good job, and good question. It is funny how we can let subtle changes make us loose sight of what is in front of our face. Why should we become satisfied with being OKAY/SO SO?
 

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Without trying to put too fine a point on it: I can understand why the UAW struck the Lansing Plant (in general terms), and I can appreciate the reasoning behind union activism and the struggle to ensure that worker's rights are maintained. They should be entitled to a decent wage, even a bonus, provided that it is earned.

The perception among many people is that UAW workers at the GM assembly plants (this also includes Ford and Chrysler) are overpaid for poor work performance. While the majority of the employees do put in a hard days work during their shift, there only needs to be one (1) employee who has had a bad day, is [email protected]@ed-off at something his supervisor said to him or a domestic home-related issue, and he doesn't feel like fully installing a particular assembly, or bolt, or rivet, or belt, or cotter-pin . . . whatever (You get the point). That, in turn, trickles down to the unsuspecting consumer, who while driving home his new Acadia on the expressway at 45 miles and hour (after picking it up from the dealership), suddenly finds himself trying to avoid having an accident because his engine just blew. Get the picture?

Of course that is a drastic example of what could (or actually already may have) occur. I would hope that does not happen to any of our membership. But, it does beg the question: What ultimately happens to the consumer, the loyal GM customer, the "I'm-just-returning-to-GM-after-20-years" buyer when he is faced with these potential concerns.

That scenario doesn't do much for our confidence in GM . . . or any other large American manufacturing outfit.

So, the next time UAW workers decide to strike for wages, benefits, and the rest, they should also consider who ultimately ensures that they get paid. Yeah, that's the guy/gal . . . the one looking back at you in the mirror. :soapbox:
 

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I agree, very well said Detnick. Many people don't realize that 'selling to existing customers' is a bigger market than 'selling to a potential customer'. This is where you hear upsell, cross-sell, etc. This is where the money is. But of course, companies top objectives are always to secure or gain new customers. And you are right, loyalty or 'customer relationship' is the ultimate selling point that a company will always resort to. And I heard 'customer relationship' starts on a golf course, and the customer winning. :cheers:

I am quite happy with my Acadia. I come here not to look for problems, but to look for tips and tricks on how I can better enjoy my Acadia. And of course, to mingle with my co-owners. Cheers. :beer:
 
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