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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
Hello I am new here
My 2016 GMC Acadia Denali was hauled into dealership today with the third drained battery.
Is anyone else having trouble with their batteries not being drained?
They are diagnosing the problem now they have had it all day,
Thanks for any information you may share.
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taking a guess.
A module is not going to sleep---- and draining the battery.

but what happened with the 1st 2 batteries?
What are your driving habits?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have 23,500 miles a few long trips and mostly in town driving
 

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Those short trips in town could be killing the battery. Not a whole lot can be done to prevent that short of putting a charger on it when the vehicle's parked at home.
 
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Hello I am new here
My 2016 GMC Acadia Denali was hauled into dealership today with the third drained battery.
Is anyone else having trouble with their batteries not being drained?
They are diagnosing the problem now they have had it all day,
Thanks for any information you may share.
As noted previously, battery drain issues like this can be difficult to diagnose even for a skilled technician. It is a time consuming process.

I read of a battery drain issue awhile back where they replaced 3 batteries and two alternators and still had a drain. The tech at the dealership should , if skilled, can use a method like below. Now, it's important that the engine is turned off and the vehicle doors are closed and left for 10 to 15 minutes. .. which is the time needed for modules to go to sleep.
There are other methods along with the one below. If the parasitic current draw is in the 500ma to 1 amp draw there may be very little voltage drop across a fuse to determine where the problem may be. But it's worth a try. Also, fuse boxes in the cabin need to be checked as well as possible stuck relays.

 

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yup- why I asked about your driving...
there was a bulletin-- regarding battery draining issues with no apparent pattern.
turns out that owners random short drives coupled with electrical device use, etc... were causing batteries to not be charged fully. the drives were not enough to properly charge the battery. It led to what many owners considered random dead batteries. Dealers ran test etc-- only to find that vehicle charging system was fine. All modules going to sleep as designed.
 

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How short are the drives?
How often?
Does it sit for days at a time?
 

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How short are the drives?
How often?
Does it sit for days at a time?
Yes, what is a short drive? I am sure that this definition is very different in the minds of different readers.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited by Moderator)
How short are the drives?
How often?
Does it sit for days at a time?
Yes, what is a short drive? I am sure that this definition is very different in the minds of different readers.

George
My short drives are hour long drives every other day but car does sit undriven also
my driving has not changed in years and I have owned a new car every 5 to 6 years with out this happening. Which is how all of my cars are driven.
 

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I don't understand, your short drives are hour long?
Regardless, I would buy a battery maintainer such as the Battery Tender Jr, and use it when you know that you won't be driving it for 3 or more days.
They're cheap, and this would be an easy test. As noted though, you probably have a parasitic drain.
 
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Agree. . an hours drive is good, but if the vehicle sits without running for the rest of a week or even 4 or 5 days the battery could get down quite a bit. Repeated use like this then reduces battery capacity so eventually it won;t charge up to full capacity.
A battery maintainer/tender as @Grantv mentions above would do well to keep the battery up.

Today's vehicles have much more electronics in them then years past. During the last year with COVID-19 we made sure our vehicles that might not get used for days or a week or more had a battery tender on them.

If you live in a cold winter climate that also lowers battery capacity and recharge time may take longer.
 

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How many of these batteries were replaced "under warranty?" If you purchased a battery, was your purchase based on price, or quality? Inferior grades of batteries won't last as long as a high quality one, as a general rule.
 

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I don't understand, your short drives are hour long?
Regardless, I would buy a battery maintainer such as the Battery Tender Jr, and use it when you know that you won't be driving it for 3 or more days.
They're cheap, and this would be an easy test. As noted though, you probably have a parasitic drain.
A few times after taking a vehicle out over the past year and winter, I forgot to hook a battery maintainer back up.
2 or 3 days later I caught it and put the maintainer back on. It then could take half a day or so before the maintainer went into monitor mode to keep a charge on it. So leaving a car sit for even a few days can run the battery down.

I did check the voltage level a few times when the battery was not on the maintainer and after 4 or 5 days to a week and it could be down to 12 volts rather than the usual 12.3 to 12.6 volts. If I started the engine with the battery down to 12 volts and having a meter on it . . . voltage would drop down to 10.5 to 11 volts upon starting and slowly build up to charging at near 15 volts. A pretty good indication that the vehicle charging system recognized a lower than optimum battery state.

Normally, if the battery had been on the maintainer, the voltage would read about 13 to 14 volts after starting it up and running a few moments. Also, the voltage would settle in to around 12.6 volts and stay there for quite awhile and then go up to 13.8 volts every now and then.
 

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I feel like a healthy battery draining in less than a week (without any unusual parasitic draw) is undersized. I guess if you go on a trip for a week and leave your vehicle at the airport, you need to keep a jumper pack with you. Unless it dies too. :LOL:
 

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I feel like a healthy battery draining in less than a week (without any unusual parasitic draw) is undersized. I guess if you go on a trip for a week and leave your vehicle at the airport, you need to keep a jumper pack with you. Unless it dies too. :LOL:
Or TSA confiscates it before you get on the plane. 🤣 🤣
 

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I feel like a healthy battery draining in less than a week (without any unusual parasitic draw) is undersized. I guess if you go on a trip for a week and leave your vehicle at the airport, you need to keep a jumper pack with you. Unless it dies too. :LOL:
Agree that the batteries in many vehicles today may be under sized for amp/hr capacity. I suppose it's all about saving some weight and MPG.

If it were warmer weather and the Acadia was left for a week at the airport, I imagine in would be ok and start. As long as it wasn't subject to short trip driving beforehand or the battery was already run down.
If it were in winter. . . it might be "flip a coin" and see if it starts.

I know many car dealers here have a time of it keeping vehicles on the lot charged up. When we were shopping the last few times for our new vehicles since 2017 each time they had to run a jumper out to the lot to get a test drive started. Not the best thing for a customer to see.
 

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I feel like a healthy battery draining in less than a week (without any unusual parasitic draw) is undersized. I guess if you go on a trip for a week and leave your vehicle at the airport, you need to keep a jumper pack with you. Unless it dies too. :LOL:
My wife's 2014 Buick Encore battery will die in a week or less if left unmaintained and the last couple previous drives were short(er) trips, even on the brand-new Interstate I just put in the vehicle. It makes her vehicle very unreliable for airport transportation. I now have her keep a charged jumper battery pack and cables in the spare wheel well. I've tried finding out what is drawing so many mV when the car is turned off, but thus far, haven't found a culprit.

I've left my Acadia at an airport for up to three weeks without any adverse battery effects, but my vehicle also tends to be driven more and for longer distances. I always keep a set of cables in my vehicle though, just in case.

The wife's car has a lot more electronics than my "older" school Acadia systems. On any of these newer vehicles, I think I would probably get a solar tender if I was going to leave it at the airport for awhile.
 

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Sitting in the vehicle with the engine at idle for prolonged periods is also a detriment to battery life. The charging system is more efficient when engine speed is >1000 rpm.
 

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And battery brand may be a thought. OP, are they factory AC Delco batteries, or...?
If my battery were doing so I'd either find that drain, or get a tender with a quick easy disconnect.
With my Z06 I almost ended up doing the latter, installing a permanent cable to the battery with a connect hanging just below the car (not visible, but easy access).
 

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Here is an article that outlines how vehicle battery charging systems have evolved.
Quite complicated compared to days in the past.
What with high electrical loads upon starting and managing that along with lower charge capabilty when idling. . .. the PCM and BCM modules in a vehicle are key in managing the electrical charge system.

The article below is particularly good in explaing how the GM charging systems have improved, but also touched on some others. All and more than you probably want to know, but a good detailed read.
LINK: Are You Smarter Than a 'Smart' Charging System? | MOTOR

One particular key point - - -
Shedding Some of the Load
" Helping the battery achieve the SOC (state of charge) goal has been the job of another smart charge feature called load shedding that has actually been around for well over a decade. The alternator’s pulley turns slower when the engine is idling, causing less output. When idling with a heavy electrical accessory load applied, the alternator may not be able to keep up, and the voltage to the battery drops below 12 volts. If this continues for very long, the battery can drop below the desired 80% SOC. Load shedding has been a function of the body control module (BCM) in both the older CS series alternators (four-terminal regulator) and the newer Regulated Voltage Control (two-terminal regulator) systems. "
 
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