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The gases from the PCV valve passes over the intake valves and will result in clogging of the intake passage into the cylinder. Is a "catch can" which filters out the gas solids needed. Seems like a simple solution to a very serious future problem that requires the blasting of the intake valves with walnut shells to remove the deposits on the intake valves. I have a 100,000 mile warranty on my Acadia and I assume that the fouling of the valves will be covered by the warranty. But, I would pay a reasonable fee for a "catch can" kit to be installed to fix a problem that is bound to happen. I would not add that to my engine on my own for it might void my expensive warranty option I purchased.
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The gases from the PCV valve passes over the intake valves and will result in clogging of the intake passage into the cylinder. Is a "catch can" which filters out the gas solids needed. Seems like a simple solution to a very serious future problem that requires the blasting of the intake valves with walnut shells to remove the deposits on the intake valves. I have a 100,000 mile warranty on my Acadia and I assume that the fouling of the valves will be covered by the warranty. But, I would pay a reasonable fee for a "catch can" kit to be installed to fix a problem that is bound to happen. I would not add that to my engine on my own for it might void my expensive warranty option I purchased.
Any comments?
What year and engine is your Acadia? It would be great if you include tha tin your profile signature. . . as in mine below.
If it has the new LGX 3.6L V6. . . . a catch can is not needed since this design has a built in oil separator and. . . so far, the intake remains clean and devoid of any deposits that wight make their way to the intake valves.

The older 3.6L variants (Like LFX or possibly earlier) benefited from an oil catch can because they had a conventional PCV path with no internal separator.
The LGX and LGZ have no need of and OCC.
 

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Don't assume your 'warranty' will cover carbon-fouled valves. Read your warranty documentation carefully so you won't be disappointed if there is no coverage for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What year and engine is your Acadia? It would be great if you include tha tin your profile signature. . . as in mine below.
If it has the new LGX 3.6L V6. . . . a catch can is not needed since this design has a built in oil separator and. . . so far, the intake remains clean and devoid of any deposits that wight make their way to the intake valves.

The older 3.6L variants (Like LFX or possibly earlier) benefited from an oil catch can because they had a conventional PCV path with no internal separator.
The LGX and LGZ have no need of and OCC.
My 2018 Acadia SLE has a 3.6L, V6 SIDI, DOHC VVT engine according to the window sticker on the car.
 

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My 2018 Acadia SLE has a 3.6L, V6 SIDI, DOHC VVT engine according to the window sticker on the car.
SIDI = Spark Ignition, Direct Injection
DOHC = Dual (or Double) Overhead Cam
VVT = Variable Valve Timing

That describes every V6 put into an Acadia since 2009. LGX is the variant designation for GM's HF 3.6L V6 used in the Gen2 (C1XX platform) Acadia from 2017 'til now.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
SIDI = Spark Ignition, Direct Injection
DOHC = Dual (or Double) Overhead Cam
VVT = Variable Valve Timing

That describes every V6 put into an Acadia since 2009. LGX is the variant designation for GM's HF 3.6L V6 used in the Gen2 (C1XX platform) Acadia from 2017 'til now.
So, are you saying I have a LGX engine in my 2018 Acadia and do not need an additional catch can? As a "super moderator" and a "staff", do you have direct knowledge of GMC engines from the manufacturer or you just a well informed consumer of GMC products? I ask that question to know how authoritative your advice is. Sorry if I offend you.
 

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I'm a well-informed consumer; a former GM tech and former GM service writer as well. I didn't write the other post you quoted, BTW. Why don't you ask that member the same thing(s)?
 

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So, are you saying I have a LGX engine in my 2018 Acadia and do not need an additional catch can? As a "super moderator" and a "staff", do you have direct knowledge of GMC engines from the manufacturer or you just a well informed consumer of GMC products? I ask that question to know how authoritative your advice is. Sorry if I offend you.
My 2018 Acadia SLE has a 3.6L, V6 SIDI, DOHC VVT engine according to the window sticker on the car.
GMC or any model car, truck or SUV do not list the production code on the window sticker. You would find it in the build sheet RPO listing found by reading the Q-code label on your Acadia driver side door jamb. When you scan it with your phone and using an app to read that, it will show one of the many RPOs as: LGX - ENGINE, 3.6L V6, SIDI, DOHC, VVT

The 3.6L LGX V6 engine has been in use for many GM vehicles since and first used in Cadillac models in 2016. Here is an article telling about the specifics. Click on the appropriate pull down tabs to read all the features and specs. - GM 3.6 Liter V6 LGX Engine Click and read all the info tab pull downs.

I particular. . . here is what is says about the PCV system - - -
" Two-stage PCV system: this revolutionary system maintains low oil consumption, featuring a pre-separator between the block and the engine’s rear cover and a high-efficiency separator in the center of the block’s “V”. "

Here also the link I posted above shows which Acadia yeas use the LGX 3.6L engine - -
2017-2019GMCAcadia6-Speed Auto M7W (FWD) or M7U (AWD)310 / 231.1 @ 6600271 / 365.9 @ 5000 rpm
2020-presentGMCAcadia9-Speed Auto M3W310 / 231.1 @ 6600271 / 365.9 @ 5000

In addition, as an informed owner and 30 year GM employee as well as previous owner of a Chevrolet Equinox which had the previous 3.6L LFX V6 engine, I and others were very interested that the newest LGX (and LGZ variant) 3.6L V6 engine had a better PCV system to prevent intake valve coking with carbon.
Also, I own a 2017 Chevrolet Colorado with the LGZ 3.6L variant.
I had and installed the Elite Engineering catch can on our previous Chevy Equinox LFX 3.6L V6 and so was very interested and impressed that GM addressed the oil and intake valve issue on this new LGX 3.6L V6.
If you google for " New GM LGX 3.6L V6" you can find many articles from +2016 discussing the details of the engine improvements including the oil separator.
 

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If you don't have a QR code or barcode scanning app on your phone, you'll find the engine's RPO code 'LGX' on the SPID label in the vehicle's rear cargo compartment.
 

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My 2018 Acadia SLE has a 3.6L, V6 SIDI, DOHC VVT engine according to the window sticker on the car.
The bottom line is. . . It's a 2018 with the 3.6L engine. So . . that makes it the LGX 3.6L which is the V6 engine used in 2017 to present Acadia C1xx (current platform).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
GMC or any model car, truck or SUV do not list the production code on the window sticker. You would find it in the build sheet RPO listing found by reading the Q-code label on your Acadia driver side door jamb. When you scan it with your phone and using an app to read that, it will show one of the many RPOs as: LGX - ENGINE, 3.6L V6, SIDI, DOHC, VVT

The 3.6L LGX V6 engine has been in use for many GM vehicles since and first used in Cadillac models in 2016. Here is an article telling about the specifics. Click on the appropriate pull down tabs to read all the features and specs. - GM 3.6 Liter V6 LGX Engine Click and read all the info tab pull downs.

I particular. . . here is what is says about the PCV system - - -
" Two-stage PCV system: this revolutionary system maintains low oil consumption, featuring a pre-separator between the block and the engine’s rear cover and a high-efficiency separator in the center of the block’s “V”. "

Here also the link I posted above shows which Acadia yeas use the LGX 3.6L engine - -
2017-2019GMCAcadia6-Speed Auto M7W (FWD) or M7U (AWD)310 / 231.1 @ 6600271 / 365.9 @ 5000 rpm
2020-presentGMCAcadia9-Speed Auto M3W310 / 231.1 @ 6600271 / 365.9 @ 5000

In addition, as an informed owner and 30 year GM employee as well as previous owner of a Chevrolet Equinox which had the previous 3.6L LFX V6 engine, I and others were very interested that the newest LGX (and LGZ variant) 3.6L V6 engine had a better PCV system to prevent intake valve coking with carbon.
Also, I own a 2017 Chevrolet Colorado with the LGZ 3.6L variant.
I had and installed the Elite Engineering catch can on our previous Chevy Equinox LFX 3.6L V6 and so was very interested and impressed that GM addressed the oil and intake valve issue on this new LGX 3.6L V6.
If you google for " New GM LGX 3.6L V6" you can find many articles from +2016 discussing the details of the engine improvements including the oil separator.
Thank you so much for the reply. It definitely more information than I asked for. As my Acadia with the LGX engine ages, I will be inspecting the PCV system for unburned oil and may take some cleaning methods to keep it running strong. Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The bottom line is. . . It's a 2018 with the 3.6L engine. So . . that makes it the LGX 3.6L which is the V6 engine used in 2017 to present Acadia C1xx (current platform).
Thanks for the response. From a reply, I now know how to scan the code on the driver door jamb and find out more about my Acadia. Thanks again.
 

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Thanks for the response. From a reply, I now know how to scan the code on the driver door jamb and find out more about my Acadia. Thanks again.
Very welcome. There are members on the Coloradofans forum who have delved pretty deeply into how well the oil separator works in the LGX/LGZ 3.6L V6 if you care to check that out.
One member went so far as to remove the intake manifold and check for oil there and in the intake tube finding none after almost a year of use. He further went on to purchase the oil separator part and posted pictures of it as well.
Several others have been monitoring the intake and for carbon deposits since 2016 and so far I have seen no mention of valve deposits nor oil in any part of the intake system.
 

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Thanks for the response. From a reply, I now know how to scan the code on the driver door jamb and find out more about my Acadia. Thanks again.
A well-informed consumer could find that info in the owners manual.
 
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