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2014 Denali

I was towing a 2016 Viking 17BH, which has a dry weight of just over 2800lbs. Family of four, myself, my wife, an 11 year old boy and a 5 year old girl. Average luggage for one weekend, nothing too heavy. I did have 3 bikes in the trailer, plus some additional camping stuff (chairs and a tent). Even with the AC on 74-75 and it was fairly hot, around 85 outside, stayed very little time in the middle where it is supposed to, and mostly somewhere around the middle of the middle larger tick and the 3/4 larger tick. It never went past the third tick, but it spent quite some time just below it. I know this is a terrible description but see the picture below, where it is circled is where it stayed most of the time just playing in that area up and down.

Is this normal for the Acadia or is something wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I understand it may not be a reason for concern, but I'm curious if it's normal, like other people see similar behavior, and it is normal behavior, or could it possibly be indicative of something that's not functioning at 100%? Even if not concernimg at this moment, at that temperature.

I'm planning to buy another trailer, the trailer I'm planning to buy use a 23-footer and try weight is a couple hundred pounds more, at just over 3000lbs, that's the reason for the concern.
 

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I'd suggest you read the "Towing" section of your owner's manual. There's nothing "normal" about dragging along (towing) one vehicle with another. You must make sure your car is in top condition before you hitch a trailer to it. That way you can drive with a degree of confidence while towing anything which meets vehicle specs.
 

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Super Moderator,

I just read the Owner’s Manual and it’s not very helpful! A lot of very general information there.

You’d think they’d give a better idea of what you can expect with your temperature gauge at various tow weights and environmental conditions - or at least a general statement about possible needle movement.

I’m assuming the OP has the V92 Trailering package from the factory on this vehicle (with Tow/Haul Mode button on the center stack), and that these factory components weren’t improperly replaced by a previous owner?
 

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So far your questions concentrate of the overheating potential. Something of at least, if not more, concern is stopping the vehicle/tow combination. Be sure you are properly setup for this.

George
 

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Y'all are free to view the OP's previous posts to seek answers about the car. There aren't many, so the task wouldn't be very arduous. This, just as the OP (and others) should look through the forum for posts about what members have experienced while towing their camping trailers - not too many there, either.
 

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2014 Denali

I was towing a 2016 Viking 17BH, which has a dry weight of just over 2800lbs. Family of four, myself, my wife, an 11 year old boy and a 5 year old girl. Average luggage for one weekend, nothing too heavy. I did have 3 bikes in the trailer, plus some additional camping stuff (chairs and a tent). Even with the AC on 74-75 and it was fairly hot, around 85 outside, stayed very little time in the middle where it is supposed to, and mostly somewhere around the middle of the middle larger tick and the 3/4 larger tick. It never went past the third tick, but it spent quite some time just below it. I know this is a terrible description but see the picture below, where it is circled is where it stayed most of the time just playing in that area up and down.

Is this normal for the Acadia or is something wrong?
I have the 2017 Acadia Limited with the V92 tow package. I pulled our 3000lb(dry) camper four different times over this summer with the wife, two kids, cargo in the vehicle, and two kayaks and two bikes in the camper. The temp gauge did the same thing yours was doing each trip. Whether it was flat ground or two hours of up and down BIG hills, the needle would never go past just below the 3/4 mark. So, I would say it's normal.
 

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2014 Denali

I was towing a 2016 Viking 17BH, which has a dry weight of just over 2800lbs. Family of four, myself, my wife, an 11 year old boy and a 5 year old girl. Average luggage for one weekend, nothing too heavy. I did have 3 bikes in the trailer, plus some additional camping stuff (chairs and a tent). Even with the AC on 74-75 and it was fairly hot, around 85 outside, stayed very little time in the middle where it is supposed to, and mostly somewhere around the middle of the middle larger tick and the 3/4 larger tick. It never went past the third tick, but it spent quite some time just below it. I know this is a terrible description but see the picture below, where it is circled is where it stayed most of the time just playing in that area up and down.

Is this normal for the Acadia or is something wrong?
I want to offer help and advice, but in doing so I ask that you try and not be offended with my comments to your questions. As you know, a GMC Acadia is a American SUV that competes with many other brands from Ford, Toyota, Nissan and so on. As a selling point, towing is indicated by one mfg. as an OK thing to do, so all the other Manufacturers chime in with saying their car will tow also. The fact is, a car, especially one manufactured over the past few decades is ill equippeed to tow. The Transmission on your Acadia runs really hot just propelling your car and you, then if you add a vehicle, boat, trailer, the transmission gets red hot, and this heat will lead to pre-mature transmission failure, and it is hard on the engine, brakes, as well. Now, if you buy a car with the so called TOWING PACKAGE, And by this I do not mean, SIMPLY A TRAILER HITCH. The car will include an extra small radiator and piping and transmission cooler, to help cool the transmission, it also may have heaver shocks and springs to allow the car to handle the extra weigh it is lugging behind it. So, my advice to you this. Never use an Acadia or similar vehicle to tow hardly anything more than 1500 pounds gross including the trailer, and even then for short distances on fairly level roads, and only on occasion. If you need to tow, get a truck, equipped with a heavy duty towing package, stronger suspension, bigger stronger engine, frame, wheels, brakes, everything, and even then it is hard on the vehicle.
 

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Gotta say, I agree with Pedro. If I had to tow something larger than perhaps a small tent trailer (and I actually wouldn't even do that with my Acadia), I'd buy/rent a vehicle built to tow (starting with a full frame).
 

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I want to offer help and advice, but in doing so I ask that you try and not be offended with my comments to your questions. As you know, a GMC Acadia is a American SUV that competes with many other brands from Ford, Toyota, Nissan and so on. As a selling point, towing is indicated by one mfg. as an OK thing to do, so all the other Manufacturers chime in with saying their car will tow also. The fact is, a car, especially one manufactured over the past few decades is ill equippeed to tow. The Transmission on your Acadia runs really hot just propelling your car and you, then if you add a vehicle, boat, trailer, the transmission gets red hot, and this heat will lead to pre-mature transmission failure, and it is hard on the engine, brakes, as well. Now, if you buy a car with the so called TOWING PACKAGE, And by this I do not mean, SIMPLY A TRAILER HITCH. The car will include an extra small radiator and piping and transmission cooler, to help cool the transmission, it also may have heaver shocks and springs to allow the car to handle the extra weigh it is lugging behind it. So, my advice to you this. Never use an Acadia or similar vehicle to tow hardly anything more than 1500 pounds gross including the trailer, and even then for short distances on fairly level roads, and only on occasion. If you need to tow, get a truck, equipped with a heavy duty towing package, stronger suspension, bigger stronger engine, frame, wheels, brakes, everything, and even then it is hard on the vehicle.
Read this again Pedro. Any electrical or mechanical, or even living creatures have a " NORMAL DESIGNED OPERATING TEMPERATURE RANGE ". When you exceed this, you shorten the life of the vehicle, the engine and transmission will suffer additional wear and tear THAT WILL SHORTEN THE LIFE FROM WHAT IT WOULD HAVE BEEN HAD YOU NOT TOWED THESE LOADS IN A SMALL CAR NOT DESIGNED TO TOW. So, do as you wish, tow as often as you want, but do not complain that the Acadia is a pile of junk after you destroy it by trying to make it a tow truck.
 

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... A SMALL CAR NOT DESIGNED TO TOW. ...
The Acadia can serve an owner in many capacities. It's designed as a "utility" vehicle. That's what the "U" means in CUV. People should have confidence to use it as such as long as they follow all manufacturer's recommendations.
 

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The Acadia can serve an owner in many capacities. It's designed as a "utility" vehicle. That's what the "U" means in CUV. People should have confidence to use it as such as long as they follow all manufacturer's recommendations.
Therein lies the problem. Lots a folks like to push the envelope. They look at the weight of the trailer but ignore the max tongue weight.

If I had a towing requirement, an Acadia would not be my first choice of vehicle. First choice would be a diesel Silverado, second choice would be a Tahoe.
 

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Therein lies the problem. Lots a folks like to push the envelope. They look at the weight of the trailer but ignore the max tongue weight.
It probably goes a bit deeper than that - like ignoring axle weight when loading the car with people and supplies, or other cargo while towing something. The tongue weight can be correct, but the vehicle is still overloaded.
 

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I know this is a different platform, but my Canyon while hauling a car, trans temps never went over 156*, so being in t 2xx* range I would be worried about your trans life expectancy. Biggest thing that will kill a transmission is heat. Do you actually have the towing from the factory, or you just installed a hitch? Towing for the Acadia requires some upgrades to keep things cool the right way.
 
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