GMC Acadia Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,321 Posts
Some of you may be old enough to remember. GM had a rudimentary version of this back in the late 40's and early 50's. It did not last long. Then all it did was turn off the bright light when approaching another vehicle. It was spoofed too easily and often did not turn the brights off when needed. Therefore, it did not last long.

I remember that one of my uncles had this on his 1949 Cadillac.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
556 Posts
George, don't know those, but I think versions of this were equipped on many cars over the years, no? I know my '88 T-Bird turned off high beams with approaching cars...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,534 Posts
George, don't know those, but I think versions of this were equipped on many cars over the years, no? I know my '88 T-Bird turned off high beams with approaching cars...
You might be interested in reading this:
"Automatic beam switching[edit]
Even when conditions would warrant the use of high-beam headlamps, drivers often do not use them.[136] There have long been efforts, particularly in America, to devise an effective automatic beam selection system to relieve the driver of the need to select and activate the correct beam as traffic, weather, and road conditions change. General Motors introduced the first automatic headlight dimmer called the 'Autronic Eye' in 1952 on their Cadillac, Buick, and Oldsmobile models; the feature was offered in other GM vehicles starting in 1953.[137][138] The system's photoresistor and associated circuitry were housed in a gunsight-like tube atop the dashboard. An amplifier module was located in the engine compartment that controlled the headlight relay using signals from the dashboard-mounted tube unit.

This pioneering setup gave way in 1958 to a system called 'GuideMatic' in reference to GM's Guide lighting division. The GuideMatic had a more compact dashtop housing and a control knob that allowed the driver to adjust the system's sensitivity threshold to determine when the headlamps would be dipped from high to low beam in response to an oncoming vehicle. By the early 1970s, this option was withdrawn from all GM models except Cadillac, on which GuideMatic was available through 1988. The photosensor for this system used an amber lens, and the adoption of retro-reflective yellow road signs, such as for oncoming curves, caused them to dim prematurely - possibly leading to their discontinuation.[citation needed]

Ford- and Chrysler-built vehicles were also available with the GM-made dimmers from the 1950s through the 1980s.[citation needed] A system called 'AutoDim' was offered on several Lincoln models starting in the mid-1950s, and eventually the Ford Thunderbird and some Mercury models[vague] offered it as well.[citation needed] Premium Chrysler and Imperial models offered a system called Automatic Beam Control throughout the 1960s and early 1970s."

source: Headlamp

I always found automatic high beams to be a pain in the butt. Much like a sunroof, it's something I doubt I'd ever use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
556 Posts
I used it, worked well for the most part IIRC. But that was a few years ago!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I found it renders it impossible to dim the high-beams for a reason other than oncoming car, so I stopped using it. If you have the fog lights on, on my 2019 Denali intellibeam will not function.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
949 Posts
Some of you may be old enough to remember. GM had a rudimentary version of this back in the late 40's and early 50's. It did not last long. Then all it did was turn off the bright light when approaching another vehicle. It was spoofed too easily and often did not turn the brights off when needed. Therefore, it did not last long.

I remember that one of my uncles had this on his 1949 Cadillac.

George
. . . My first car was a 1955 Oldsmobile loaded with Magic Eye auto headlight dimmer and Wonder Bar electric tuning for the radio. You could set the sensitivity of the radio station sensing and use either the "Bar" on the radio or a push button on the floor board to change radio stations. WCFL . . KAAYall the way from Little Rock at night would come in great. . . 50,000 watts !
Oh yeah. . . I was living large in the Olds hard top 4 door. . . . lol . Had a few "adventures" in it. Hey . .. not what you're thinking ! lol

Oh. . no wait a minute. . . I think this was my "older brother" who had the '55 Olds . . . LOL

 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top