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We have had a 2013 Acadia (SLE2 I believe) for 42 months after buying it off of someone else's 36 month standard lease. It was always the family we car we wanted and have really enjoyed the vehicle. We've taken great care of it, regular maintenance, etc, and seems to have hit some bad luck. The transmission started slipping a couple weeks ago and now both an independent transmission shop and the dealership say the transmission needs to be replaced.

We're now stuck between a rock and a hard place between a major mechanical failure and sinking a significant amount of money into a repair or do we cut out losses and get out of the car.

The repair cost is currently 50% of what the dealership is offering for the vehicle and other dealerships and Car Max are offering less. The dealership we work with is very customer friendly and I believe understand this is a tough situation so offering a bit more.

My concern is sinking the money in and that only being the beginning of more and more repairs. Maybe it makes more sense to move on? Does anyone here have a recommendation based on their experience with Acadias and possibly this specific year? From what I understand, there were engine/transmission issues in the early versions, but had "mostly" figured it out by this model. (For what its worth, we own the car outright).

Thanks for reading and any advice. If I can provide any additional information, please let me know.
 

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Welcome to the forum.
Good luck with your decision. The Acadia is getting 'old' and will require certain things just to maintain its quality and safety. Those aren't inexpensive unless you're up to the challenge of DIY work. Just something to think about.
 

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We have had a 2013 Acadia (SLE2 I believe) for 42 months after buying it off of someone else's 36 month standard lease. It was always the family we car we wanted and have really enjoyed the vehicle. We've taken great care of it, regular maintenance, etc, and seems to have hit some bad luck. The transmission started slipping a couple weeks ago and now both an independent transmission shop and the dealership say the transmission needs to be replaced.

We're now stuck between a rock and a hard place between a major mechanical failure and sinking a significant amount of money into a repair or do we cut out losses and get out of the car.

The repair cost is currently 50% of what the dealership is offering for the vehicle and other dealerships and Car Max are offering less. The dealership we work with is very customer friendly and I believe understand this is a tough situation so offering a bit more.

My concern is sinking the money in and that only being the beginning of more and more repairs. Maybe it makes more sense to move on? Does anyone here have a recommendation based on their experience with Acadias and possibly this specific year? From what I understand, there were engine/transmission issues in the early versions, but had "mostly" figured it out by this model. (For what its worth, we own the car outright).

Thanks for reading and any advice. If I can provide any additional information, please let me know.
If it helps in your decision making . . .
If you decide to have the dealer replace the transmission, it comes with a 100,000 mi / 3 yr transferable GM warranty.

So after forking out $5,000 you have 3 years of peace of mind. Realistically, you can expect 6 more years of a new transmission based on your ownership experience.
After the transmission replacement, which is a big hit, I think expecting to pay up to $2,000 per year of repairs for an older full sized suv is reasonable.
So this year and next year might be $7,000 combined in repairs - but if $300/ month is significantly less than you would pay for another car, you are still ahead each and every month.

Having an older car, you no longer have payments and you save a ton of money on registration and insurance, even body shop repairs (you can go to Joey's One Day Paint and Body). There's a ton of aftermarket and discount GM parts available for Lambda models, even used parts with a warranty, and by now, every independent knows how to work on them.

It comes down to safety and reliability. If you are putting in up to $2k/yr and not feeling the car is safe or reliable, its time to sell the old junker.

Very few problems will instantly disable your car and leave you completely stranded (the days of burned out ignitors and disintegrating distributor rotators are gone). Blowing the plastic radiator will leave you stranded, and it won't be a 3 hr repair (in/out time), or roadside serviceable. Nearly all modern vehicles have plastic radiators, so I say by year 10, have it replaced.

If you've had good luck with your car for the last 3-1/2yrs its a good sign. Others have problems every month or two and in those cases, they need to ditch the car. Good luck
 

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What Divot said... Just sold my 2011 SLT2 with nearly 140,000 miles. It was a great vehicle and never had timing chain or transmission problems, but was in the sweet spot to potentially start seeing those issues and other things. If your transmission was still good, I would bet the dealer's purchase offer would not equal their current offer plus whatever your repair quote is, since they can do the work at cost.

It just depends on what your risk tolerance for potential future problems is. Maybe find the cheapest transmission repair you can with a one-year warranty, drive it another year and then sell it?

Tom
 

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I've always had used vehicles because I have never been able to afford anything new.

From my experience with having used vehicles, if you can buy a new one, do so. If you can't, then I would have your mechanic (not the dealership mechanic) give a good "once over" to your engine and see if it's up for a new transmission. If the mechanic thinks the engine will last at least 5 more years without problems, then I would suggest replacing the tranny.

It might be cheaper to have your transmission rebuilt instead of replaced with a new one.

Be warned though.......from my experience over the years, once you start sinking money into it, it doesn't stop.

I had an old Chevy van once, and I was spending around $200 a month keeping it going. When I finally realized how much it was costing me to keep that thing going, I traded it in for something else.

But if you are like me, and you just don't have the money for "new"..........then you will have to make the decision........is the vehicle one that you want to keep? If it isn't, then get something else, or get another Acadia. If you do want to keep it, then you will definitely need to be putting some money into it.

If you do replace the tranny, then I would suggest looking into used car warranties. They are usually cheap enough to make low monthly payments on, and the cover pretty much anything you want them to cover........so if something else does go kaput on the vehicle, you can use the warranty to have it fixed. I've used mine twice already, and all I had to do was pay the $200 deductible on it, and they paid the rest.

But, if you decide to get another Acadia (or something else), don't jump into getting anything. I wanted an Acadia since the first day they came out, but I never could afford one until a couple of years ago. But..............it took me almost a year of looking before I found the exact one I wanted, with the features I wanted, in the color I wanted, with the interior I wanted. AND the price was super cheap, and the used car dealer I bought it from was super honest, helped me get an even lower price than they were going to give me, plus added on the used car warranty to my payment plan! Not only that, they got me some new kind of used car loan where the interest rate gets cheaper the more payments I make and the closer I get to paying it off.

It is a great benefit if you can do some research into which ever decision you are going to make. Get all possible aspects of what you can do, how it can be done, and what kind of deal you can get.
 

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To me it doesn't make sense to ditch a 6-7 yr old car.
Even GM cars last longer than that.
And it hasn't been a "problem car."

But please clarify
The dealership is offering $10-11k on a 6 yr old Acadia with a dead transmission?

Take it.
I've never heard of such a thing.

Use it for a down payment on one of their 2016 CPO Acadia (the 2017 and up are smaller, the 2017 limited is full size, but none on the market) w/ tax license maybe $27k - trade-in = $16k, $300/mo/5yr

So $250/mo/repairs or $300/mo/cpo covered car, more reliable - no brainer

Nobody else in the world will give you $11k for a dead tranny 6 yo Acadia (Acadia do not hold up value well, even brand new ones are being sold by dealer at $7-9k discounts, severe sales slump after sizing down).
 

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We had to replace our transmission in our 2010. We went to a reputable transmission shop. It was $4500 with a 5yr 100 000 miles warranty. We take it back at certain intervals and he services it free. Better than new car payments.
 

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How many miles on this vehicle? After a 3-year lease and your 42 months, it’s probably ~ 90,000-100,00?

That’s not even at mid-life yet!

I have to agree with the statement, “no way would I be ditching a 6-7 year-old vehicle”.

But no way would I be paying $5,000 for transmission work, either!

Shop around. Cast a wider net, and cut that cost in half! Then, drive it 5 more years for a gross cost of $500/year. Then you’ll be at 175,000 miles with good justification for moving to another vehicle.
 
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