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Author Topic: Brake Fluid Flush  (Read 10126 times, 39 Replies)
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« on: July 29, 2011, 09:45:55 AM »

Anyone know the recommended time interval for the 2008 acadia?   
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« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2011, 12:17:02 PM »

Replacing brake fluid is recommended every 2-3 years.  Since brake fluid is hydroscopic (absorbs moisture), I wouldn't recommend going longer than 3 years between changes.  It's especially important if you pull a trailer - the more moisture in the brake fluid, the lower the boiling point of the fluid, and the easier for the fluid to boil when under high stress (downhill braking, etc.), which will effect the braking performance.

I replaced the brake fluid in my '09 Outlook (Build Date of 11/08) @ 41K miles.  I replaced the fluid with ATE "Blue"-dye DOT 4 Brake Fluid.

ATE Super Blue Racing High Performance Brake Fluid is designed to excel within the extreme demands made on a race vehicle and exceeds all DOT4 standards. It is compatible with and will mix well with most DOT3, DOT4, or DOT 5.1 fluids.

The formula offers a minimal drop in boiling point resulting in a long-lasting fluid that may not need to be changed for up to 3 years under normal highway driving conditions. Products with a lower wet boiling point have to be replaced considerably more often (e.g., DOT3 products should be replaced annually). The overall high dry and wet boiling points make this fluid an excellent choice for street driven vehicles, too, where brake fluid is flushed less frequently than that in race-driven vehicles.

Features/Benefits of ATE Super Blue Racing Brake Fluid:

Blue tint of fluid makes bleeding brakes easier
Ideal for race use, excellent choice for street driven vehicles, too
Boiling point minimum: 536 degrees F
Wet boiling point minimum: 388 degrees F
Viscosity at -104 degrees F: max 1,400 mm 2/5
Designed to last up to 3 years under normal highway driving conditions
To maintain the functional reliability of brake systems, brake fluid must be changed according to the specifications of the vehicle manufacturer (quality and change interval). In race/track applications, it becomes even more critical that the brake fluid is routinely changed to maintain optimum performance.

For race applications, vehicle owners will often alternate fluid flushes between ATE Super Blue Racing Brake Fluid and ATE TYP 200 Amber Brake Fluid. The identical specifications of the fluid and color difference make it easy to know when the old fluid is completely flushed out of the system.


http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/accessoryDetail.jsp?ID=21
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« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2011, 09:37:02 PM »

I did mine a few months ago when I did my front brakes...it was very dark, almost green.  I have an 07 with 45K miles.

Because it looked ugly, I will probably flush again before winter at my next oil change, tire rotation, etc.
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« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2011, 09:44:20 AM »

Many manuafcturers are adding this to the routine maintenance schedule - VW for example, every three years.  That reminds me - I need to do that for my daughter's Jetta now.
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« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2011, 06:29:16 PM »

Replacing brake fluid is recommended every 2-3 years.  Since brake fluid is hydroscopic (absorbs moisture), I wouldn't recommend going longer than 3 years between changes.  It's especially important if you pull a trailer - the more moisture in the brake fluid, the lower the boiling point of the fluid, and the easier for the fluid to boil when under high stress (downhill braking, etc.), which will effect the braking performance.

I replaced the brake fluid in my '09 Outlook (Build Date of 11/08) @ 41K miles.  I replaced the fluid with ATE "Blue"-dye DOT 4 Brake Fluid.

ATE Super Blue Racing High Performance Brake Fluid is designed to excel within the extreme demands made on a race vehicle and exceeds all DOT4 standards. It is compatible with and will mix well with most DOT3, DOT4, or DOT 5.1 fluids.

The formula offers a minimal drop in boiling point resulting in a long-lasting fluid that may not need to be changed for up to 3 years under normal highway driving conditions. Products with a lower wet boiling point have to be replaced considerably more often (e.g., DOT3 products should be replaced annually). The overall high dry and wet boiling points make this fluid an excellent choice for street driven vehicles, too, where brake fluid is flushed less frequently than that in race-driven vehicles.

Features/Benefits of ATE Super Blue Racing Brake Fluid:

Blue tint of fluid makes bleeding brakes easier
Ideal for race use, excellent choice for street driven vehicles, too
Boiling point minimum: 536 degrees F
Wet boiling point minimum: 388 degrees F
Viscosity at -104 degrees F: max 1,400 mm 2/5
Designed to last up to 3 years under normal highway driving conditions
To maintain the functional reliability of brake systems, brake fluid must be changed according to the specifications of the vehicle manufacturer (quality and change interval). In race/track applications, it becomes even more critical that the brake fluid is routinely changed to maintain optimum performance.

For race applications, vehicle owners will often alternate fluid flushes between ATE Super Blue Racing Brake Fluid and ATE TYP 200 Amber Brake Fluid. The identical specifications of the fluid and color difference make it easy to know when the old fluid is completely flushed out of the system.


http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/accessoryDetail.jsp?ID=21


is there any tips/tricks to doing it?
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« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2011, 07:53:01 PM »

There is no recommended change interval specified in my 2010 owner's manual.  As I recall, my 1999 Honda Odyssey called for a change at 100K miles.  Every 40K or so doesn't hurt, but seems needlessly frequent.
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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2011, 09:06:48 PM »

There is no recommended change interval specified in my 2010 owner's manual.  As I recall, my 1999 Honda Odyssey called for a change at 100K miles.  Every 40K or so doesn't hurt, but seems needlessly frequent.
Time is as critical as miles in this case.
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« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2011, 09:50:59 PM »

Time and heat Smiley


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« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2011, 11:40:48 AM »

Time and heat Smiley

Sent from my iPhone 3G S using Tapatalk

Considering the performance of the brake fluid degrades as it absorbs moisture (water is compressible - bad for effective braking), and the risk of corroding the brake caliper pistons & bores, along with the master cylinder internals, the ABS module/solenoids, etc., increases with time, spending an hour's worth of time (or dealer labor) to flush the fluid out and replace it every 2-3 years is a reasonable maintenance practice to avoid higher costs down the road (replacing a caliper, ABS module, etc.).

As mentioned, GM doesn't address this maint. practice in the owner's manual, don't know if it's included on the Maint. Schedule I or II.  If it's not, GM is kidding themselves and their customers.
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« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2011, 11:53:43 AM »

... (water is compressible - bad for effective braking), ...

since when?  Huh? Huh? :Smiley

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« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2011, 02:55:49 PM »

I've seen a few busted blocks...bent connecting rods...bent push rods from engines that had ingested some of that "compressible water".
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« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2011, 05:56:58 PM »

I think the OP meant NON-compressable.
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« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2011, 09:29:17 PM »

I think the OP meant NON-compressable.

Miscible would be more likely. Grin
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« Reply #13 on: August 10, 2011, 11:36:08 AM »

whichever one it is--- it sure makes the brakes squishy...
flush and brakes are nice and hard again.
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« Reply #14 on: August 10, 2011, 03:02:02 PM »

The real reason to replace brake fluid is to get a higher boiling point back, see below info from wikipedia.


Boiling point
 
Brake fluid is subjected to very high temperatures, especially in the wheel cylinders of drum brakes and disk brake calipers. It must have a high boiling point to avoid vaporizing in the lines. This vaporization is a problem because vapor is compressible and negates hydraulic fluid transfer of braking force.
 
Quality standards refer to a brake fluid's "dry" and "wet" boiling points. Oftentimes, a car will become flooded with brake fluid. Wet boiling point, which is usually much lower (although above most normal service temperatures), refers to the fluid's boiling point after absorbing a certain amount of moisture. This is several (single digit) percent, varying from formulation to formulation. Glycol-ether/dot three/dot four/dot five point one brake fluids are hygroscopic (water absorbing), which means they absorb moisture from the atmosphere under normal humidity levels. Non-hygroscopic fluids (e.g. silicone/DOT 5-based formulations), are hydrophobic, and can maintain an acceptable boiling point over the fluid's service life, although at the cost of potential phase separation/water pooling and freezing/boiling in the system over time - the main reason single phase hygroscopic fluids are used.
 
Boiling points for common braking fluids [1]
 



Dry boiling point
 
Wet boiling point
 


DOT 3
 
205 C (401 F)
 
140 C (284 F)
 


DOT 4
 
230 C (446 F)
 
155 C (311 F)
 


DOT 5
 
260 C (500 F)
 
180 C (356 F)
 


DOT 5.1
 
270 C (518 F)
 
190 C (374 F)
 

Wet boiling point defined as 3.7% water by volume.
 
Viscosity
 
For reliable, consistent brake system operation, brake fluid must maintain a constant viscosity under a wide range of temperatures, including extreme cold. This is especially important in systems with an anti-lock braking system (ABS), traction control, and stability control (ESP).
 
Corrosion
 
Brakes fluids must not corrode the metals used inside components such as calipers, master cylinders, etc. They must also protect against corrosion as moisture enters the system. Additives (corrosion inhibitors) are added to the base fluid to accomplish this.
 
Compressibility
 
Brake fluids must maintain a low level of compressibility that remains low, even with varying temperatures.
 
Service and maintenance
 
Most automotive professionals agree that glycol-based brake fluid, (DOT 3, DOT 4, DOT 5.1) should be flushed, or changed, every 12 years.[2] Many manufacturers also require periodic fluid changes to ensure reliability and safety. Once installed, moisture diffuses into the fluid through brake hoses and rubber seals and, eventually, the fluid will have to be replaced when the water content becomes too high. Electronic testers and test strips are commercially available to measure moisture content. The corrosion inhibitors also degrade over time. New fluid should always be stored in a sealed container to avoid moisture intrusion.
 
DOT 5 is silicone fluid and the above does not apply. Ideally, silicone fluid should be used only to fill non-ABS systems that have not been previously filled with glycol based fluid. Any system that has used glycol based fluid will contain moisture; glycol fluid disperses the moisture throughout the system and contains corrosion inhibitors. Silicone fluid does not allow moisture to enter the system, but does not disperse any that is already there, either. A system filled from dry with silicone fluid does not require the fluid to be changed at intervals, only when the system has been disturbed for a component repair or renewal. The United States armed forces have standardised on silicone brake fluid since the 1990s.
 
Brake fluid is not considered a "top up" fluid. If it is low, there is usually a problem. Brake fluid level in the master cylinder will drop as the linings (pads or shoes) wear and the calipers or wheel cylinders extend further to compensate. This added fluid may need to be removed when renewing pads or shoes. Overspill from pushing back pistons should be avoided, because glycol based fluid will quickly lift or strip paints and other coatings on contact (it can be removed by quickly washing with water, not wiping). Brake fluid level may also be low because of a leak, which could result in a loss of hydraulic pressure and consequently a significant loss of braking ability. Modern cars have split hydraulic circuits to ensure against total hydraulic failure. Brake fluids with different DOT ratings should not be mixed; not all DOT fluid is compatible. This is because it will dilute and reduce the properties of the higher specification DOT fluid, or in the case of mixing of glycol with silicone fluid may cause corrosion due to trapped moisture.
 
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« Reply #15 on: August 10, 2011, 09:10:54 PM »

I had the squeaky brake pedal, but didn't believe in GM's solution that the brake fluid needs the updated part number.

After my brake fluid flush, my pedal no longer squeaks.

I found that interesting.
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« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2012, 10:29:02 AM »

I recently had my brake fluid flushed by my GMC dealership on May of 2012, since then my brake pedal has been squeaking which is very frustrating. Does anyone know the best way to flush out the fluid and what kind of fluid is best used for my 08 Acadia? Anything will help since I won't pay another $125 for a brake flush  thumbdown
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« Reply #17 on: September 28, 2012, 10:39:08 AM »

some members have reported using Valvoline synthetic. the squeaking stopped.

There is a service bulletin to change the fluid to stop the squeak.

YOu can use a turkey baster to take out MOST of the fluid in the reservoir.. (You dont want to remove it all)...
and refill with the new stuff.
Then at each wheel- using a small hose (to drain liquid into a cup) open the bleeder valve while someone pumps the pedal about 3 times-- and then on the last press- HOLDS down the pedal-- this is when you open the bleeder for a little bit- and close. repeat several times until you notice a slight change in the fluids color.

Thats the short description--- theres a post on here with directions.
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« Reply #18 on: September 28, 2012, 10:54:00 AM »

Thanks for the info rbarrios. I will definitely go out and get a turkey basted and Valvoline synthetic brake fluid.  Cheers
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« Reply #19 on: September 28, 2012, 12:37:05 PM »

The sqeaking pedal caused by brake fluid issue: is actual a sqeak in the master cylinder that resonants out into passenger compartment
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